Iggy Pop berlin

Iggy Pop ‎– Berlin 91 Label: Narva ‎– 07 LPx2 Format: 2 ... With Brick by Brick, Iggy Pop was back at the top of his game. And this record is a good exemple of what he was able to do on stage; with a good sound quality. While living in West Berlin, sitting on floors because chairs were deemed unnatural, the two musicians traveled to French and German studios to record their albums, with Iggy Pop releasing The Idiot, and Lust for Life, while Bowie composed his famed Berlin Trilogy of Low, Heroes, and Lodger. Each of these albums has attained classic status, and from then on, according to Art-Sheep, the two ... Iggy Pop’s years living and recording in Berlin with David Bowie are the focus of a new box set. Aptly titled The Bowie Years, the seven-disc set contains remastered versions of Pop and Bowie ... Iggy Pop is an American singer, songwriter, musician, record producer, and actor. Iggy Pop’s fruitful collaboration with David Bowie in Berlin, Germany — resulting in the Stooges singer’s acclaimed 1977 solo albums The Idiot and Lust for Life — will be the focus of an ... – ‘The Bowie Years’, a seven-CD boxset exploring Iggy Pop’s Berlin-era albums, is available from May 29 via UMC Advertisement The world's defining voice in music and pop culture since 1952.

OldSchoolCool: History's cool kids, looking fantastic

2012.04.21 22:38 Apaz OldSchoolCool: History's cool kids, looking fantastic

/OldSchoolCool **History's cool kids, looking fantastic!** A pictorial and video celebration of history's coolest kids, everything from beatniks to bikers, mods to rude boys, hippies to ravers. And everything in between. If you've found a photo, or a photo essay, of people from the past looking fantastic, here's the place to share it.
[link]


2020.08.28 13:21 House_of_Suns /r/QOTSA Official Band of the Week 17: IGGY POP

Today we are going to take a dive into a Michigan Trailer Park.
I know, I know -- I can sense your excitement. Who doesn’t like going to a trailer park? It is here that we can find the archetypal artist who will lose themself in the music, the moment, they own it, they had better never let it go.
No, no, no….the trailer park is not on 8 Mile Road (though if I found Kim Basinger in a trailer park I would probably want to stay for some of that legendary spaghetti.)
And no, we are not looking for some guy in a feather boa who somehow pretends to be an American Badass. We are not visiting that guy who vociferously noted that he wasn’t straight out of Compton -- and he only dresses like he’s straight out the trailer. That guy (and presumably his weird fedora) grew up on a 6-Acre estate in a 5,000 square foot home.
Our hero really did come out of the trailer park. He has walked the stage with giants, and has stood bare-chested and leather-like among them. Today, we will focus on someone who seems to have developed a lifelong t-shirt allergy. A man that is accustomed to breaking the mold, forging something new, and of course, showing some skin. That's right. You could say this one’s got a real Lust for Life.
You guessed it, today’s artist is the one and only IGGY POP
About Them
I am willing to bet that there has never been a rock star named “James Newell Osterberg Jr”. It really doesn’t roll off the tongue.
Good thing young Jimmy realized this too. Born in 1947 and raised in that aforementioned tornado bowling alley, Iggy Pop was fortunate to have had exceptionally supportive parents, Louella Christensen and James Newell Osterberg Sr., who encouraged his forays into drumming and the music scene. After playing in a number of high school bands, Iggy adopted his trademark moniker after one of the first bands he recorded with, The Iguanas.
Yep. Now you are gonna look at him and think “Iguana Pop”. You’re welcome.
Iguana’s parents knew that their little reptile was exceptional from a young age. Though there was overwhelming societal pressure for him to live a normal life (and he did go to the University of Michigan before dropping out) they always supported him in his choices - no matter how weird they were. They went so far as to move out of their master bedroom to give him the space so that he could practice the drums. In contrast to this, Kid Rock had his own studio at age 13. (Side note: I may be completely making that up for dramatic contrast, but we all know that dude is a Chad). When Iggy dropped out to go to Chicago, his parents - while they worried - supported him.
Let’s not forget that his teenage years were the 1960’s, after all. In a time when the world was going absolutely crazy, many families were completely torn apart by conflict. Not the Osterbergs. But one must imagine that Iggy gave his parents plenty of reason to worry by his legendary on-stage antics, his self-destructive drug use, his multiple arrests, and his fuck-you punk attitude.
The transformative moment in Iggy’s musical career came when he moved off of the drum kit and out to the microphone. Iggy attributes this in part to seeing The Doors play live. Jim Morrison was high or drunk or both. He was rude and antagonistic and confrontational and pissed off everyone who came to the concert...and yet had a music career.
Iggy knew he could do that.
And so, the legendary punk band The Stooges was born. Joined by fellow Michigan natives guitarist Ron Asheton, Drummer Scott Asheton and bassist Dave Alexander, Iggy decided to do everything he could on stage to antagonize and fight his audience. In concerts, Iggy would bring out a blender or a vacuum cleaner just to increase the volume and the feedback from his mic.
The concerts were wild. They were primitive. They were outrageous. Iggy, bare chested, would cut himself with broken glass. He would smear peanut butter and ground meat on his chest. He threw watermelons at the audience, once concussing a fan. He snorted PCP and was immobilized and was only able to mumble the lyrics. He would expose his genitals. He was one of the first front men to go stage diving and crowd surfing.
Yeah, I know that this all sounds tame today. Hell, this is probably nothing compared to your last Tinder date. But in the late 1960’s, it was absolutely groundbreaking. The Stooges are widely considered to be one of the very first Punk Rock bands. The music did not matter so much as the attitude and the performance. They were the ultimate underground band and they lived the underground band life - absolute blowouts on stage, fueled by alcohol and drugs and addiction.
As you might expect, The Stooges’ antics drew a lot of attention. They got a record deal with Elektra (the same label that signed The Doors) and all kinds of attention from other artists. The most important connection for Iggy during this time was from the Thin White Duke himself, David Bowie. The Stooges released two albums - The Stooges and Fun House; toured; broke up; re-formed, released another album (Raw Power, produced by Bowie) and then broke up again.
Our favourite Iguana’s drug use got to the point where he was dancing with heroin. (Side note: who knew that broken glass, ground beef, and peanut butter use could lead to a heroin addiction? I mean, aside from being the worst possible version of PB&J, of course.) Iggy’s continued drug use would lead to the breakup of The Stooges. But it also launched his solo career.
As a solo artist, he completely changed his act and began singing Gospel music and hymns.
Nah, just kidding. When your night life involves snorting PCP and hurling melons, you are headed down a path of rock and roll debauchery. (Side note: if you are snorting melons and hurling PCP, you are doing it wrong.)
His antics continued, and amplified. He allowed himself to be whipped until he bled on stage. He fought biker gangs at concerts. He dove off the stage and face planted when an angry audience refused to let him crowd surf. Iggy checked himself into a mental hospital to clean up. Allegedly, Ziggy Stardust himself went to visit our saddle-skinned hero, and brought him some c-c-c-c-c-cocaine. I suppose that some people beat their addiction to one drug by becoming addicted to a different one...but replacing heroin with cocaine (though it might reduce your needle tracks) is gonna be hell on the nose. Bowie would recall the incident: “He wasn’t well; that’s all we knew. We thought we should bring him some drugs, because he probably hadn’t had any for days!”
Coke-toting Bowie proved to be one of the only visitors that Iggy received during his stay at the psyche ward. However, Major Tom’s continuing support soon saw Iggy joining him as a companion for the Station to Station tour. This was the Iguana’s first real experience in professional touring, and he was thoroughly impressed. That is, until both of them got caught handling the devils lettuce in Rochester, NY. Yeah, the drug addiction was still a problem - so what was the obvious solution?
Moving to West Berlin of course!
Yes, the pair went out to grand old, Soviet-surrounded free Germany. Berlin was a long way away from his Michigan trailer park, and Aladdin Sane wasn’t exactly a guy you’d meet in Muskegon. But Berlin - and Bowie - were just what he needed. See, Iggy was a bonafide performer, but Bowie and Berlin made him a songwriter. This collaboration - and a new deal with RCA records - led the leathery reptilian to create two amazing albums.
The Idiot features Bowie as a producer, on backing vocals, and on multiple instruments. It also has the first version of China Girl, a song they co-wrote. Bowie would famously re-record it for his multi-platinum album Let’s Dance. Admit it, that’s the version you know. The Idiot was released in March of 1977.
Bowie and Iggy went immediately back into the studio and recorded Lust for Life between April and June of 1977. This would prove to be his most iconic and enduring album, featuring the now quintessential title track and the Doors-inspired melodic song, The Passenger. While you may have heard these timeless tracks on car commercials, they represented an artist coming to a brand new stage of his career.
Critics hated it. Not because they weren’t great songs, but because the music was so completely different from anything he had done. Rolling Stone complained that his “...new stance is so utterly unchallenging and cautious.”
But Iggy did not care. When everyone else was into stadium rock, he fought his audience. Like, physically, with his fists. With the rise of Punk, he did the opposite, and became an actual singer. He is a walking, talking, peanut butter sandwich of contradiction.
When music went left, he went right. When everyone was going in one direction, he refused to move (perhaps because of the PCP). When synth-pop and Culture Club were big in the ‘80s, he recorded Real Wild Child. Somewhere along the way, the kid from upstate Michigan became more than anyone could have imagined.
He has 20 different solo albums and has collaborated on various projects with the B-52s, Bootsy Collins, Andy Warhol, Ridley Scott, Wes Craven, Nickelodeon, Debbie Harry, Guns ‘n’ Roses, Marilyn Manson, White Zombie, and has appeared as a mother-fucking-Vorta on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. He reunited with The Stooges and recorded and released two more albums. He has won a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Hell, he probably filled in on drums with your Great Uncle’s bar band for a week back in the 60s. He’s seen it all, and has done even more. He defines what it means to be an icon.
So it is not surprising that his discography is like a visit to a BDSM dungeon: it takes you to uncomfortable places, but might just awaken something in you. Seriously, he has gone in every direction you can imagine -- plus some that you can’t, you uncreative clod. That’s why she left you, you know! You need to up your game in the bedroom!
Fuck. I might be projecting a bit there.
Anyway, we know that his music career led him to film, television, radio, guest appearances, and cruise line ads. But for our purposes, we also know that Iggy Pop was an absolute inspiration for a young and impressionable Joshua Michael Homme. When he had the opportunity, Josh cut an album with Iggy (Post Pop Depression 2016), shot a documentary with him (American Valhalla, 2017), and went on a world wide tour. Or, well, a tour of the US and Europe (plus one show in Canada). Suck it, rest of the world.
And if that kind of endorsement is not enough for you to take a dive into his back catalogue, I am going to hit you with a fucking melon. No, not just a melon - a melon in the middle of a carnal act. And those are goddam hard to find, I don’t mind telling you.
Links to QOTSA
Man, if you haven't seen American Valhalla, then what are you even doing here? Trust me, that movie makes every connection pretty clear.
But for those without a spare hour and a half, here’s a quick rundown. Josh and Iggy, Rock Gods that they are, blessed us in 2016 with the album Post Pop Depression. This joint effort, which also included Matt Helders (Arctic Monkeys) and Dean Fertita (You should already know what band this guy is in), was recorded at the legendary Rancho de la Luna. They even set out on a tour across the US and Europe in support of it.
There’s a lot more to talk about considering all the thought and effort that the two put into the record, but I’ll leave that to you and your movie watching habits. Trust me, it’s worth your time.
But before we go, it's worth mentioning again that Josh grew up listening to Iggy Pop, and, well, everyone and their mom has been influenced by this guy. He just exudes and embodies that kind of pure rock-star power. I’d bet that the Godfather of Punk has been a pretty important influence on our boy Josh, just for stage antics alone.
To quote Josh:
“What I thought (punk rock) was, was a total lie. And then I heard Iggy Pop’s Lust for Life and The Idiot for the first time”.
Their Music
SOLO STUFF BY IGGY:
Gardenia - From Post Pop Depression, the lead single from the record
American Valhalla - Also from Post Pop Depression, I swear the link goes to the song and not the full hour and a half long movie, trust me
Lust For Life - You’ve got some Royal Caribbean coming.
Nightclubbing - We’re an ice machine
The Passenger - I ride through the city’s back side
China Girl - Ooo Baby, just you shut your mouth.
Real Wild Child (Wild One) - wild one wild one wild one wild one wild one wild one wild one wild one wild one….just in case you made it this far, in the video, that’s not a coat, that’s just his skin
Candy - I just can’t seem to let this one go
Kill City - You know you want to turn that boy loose
I’m Bored - I’m the Chairman of the Bored.
STUFF BY THE STOOGES:
Search and Destroy - Iggy’s hardly a forgotten boy now, but boy is he still searching’ to destroy
T.V. Eye - LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOORRRRRRRRRDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
I Wanna Be Your Dog - Everyone’s favourite Christmas Song
Gimme Danger - This one is a “”Little Stranger”” than the rest (Ba dum tsss)
1969 - Its 1969 today, all across the USA
Show Them Some Love
/IggyPop -- it is absolutely criminal that this sub has so few members. Consider joining and adding content.
Previous Posts
Tool
Alice in Chains
King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard
Rage Against the Machine
Soundgarden
Run the Jewels
Royal Blood
Arctic Monkeys
Ty Segall
Eagles of Death Metal
Them Crooked Vultures
Led Zeppelin
Greta Van Fleet
Ten Commandos
Screaming Trees
Sound City Players
submitted by House_of_Suns to qotsa [link] [comments]


2020.08.15 04:01 rustyprophecy Opinions on the Bowie-produced The Idiot and Lust for Life by Iggy Pop

Curious to find out the opinions of other Bowie fans for Iggy Pop's albums The Idiot and Lust for Life that Bowie produced during his Berlin period in 1977 (released between Low and Heroes).
Personally think that Lust for Life is one of the best garage rock / rock and roll albums of all time, let alone the 1970s.
submitted by rustyprophecy to DavidBowie [link] [comments]


2020.07.30 16:36 Soul_Man2004 Photographers

An editing base for David Bowie's photographers.
The original was removed by bots so I'm using my profile instead. Don't think I'll be able to put it anywhere else.
Anyone coming into my profile to use this, feel free. It's unorganized as hell.
A:
B:
C:
D:
E:
F:
G:
H:
I:
J:
K:
L:
M:
N:
P:
R:
S:
T:
U:
V:
W:
Y:
submitted by Soul_Man2004 to u/Soul_Man2004 [link] [comments]


2020.07.19 15:06 AnomusAntor Speaking of moustache bowie.... (David Bowie and Iggy Pop in Berlin, 1977, maybe in disguise) (here, Iggy really looks like a pedo, standing in front of girls school, searching for the cutest to destroy)

Speaking of moustache bowie.... (David Bowie and Iggy Pop in Berlin, 1977, maybe in disguise) (here, Iggy really looks like a pedo, standing in front of girls school, searching for the cutest to destroy) submitted by AnomusAntor to DavidBowie [link] [comments]


2020.07.14 13:30 publicjulian Trying to find the location from this photo of David Bowie and Iggy Pop in '77. It's definitely in Berlin.

Trying to find the location from this photo of David Bowie and Iggy Pop in '77. It's definitely in Berlin. submitted by publicjulian to berlin [link] [comments]


2020.05.28 05:26 peewinkle How Iggy Pop and David Bowie's Berlin era inspires punk bands in 2020

submitted by peewinkle to IggyPop [link] [comments]


2020.05.03 15:50 warmcrystalwave Iggy Pop & David Bowie - Low Idiots Lusting After Heroes

Iggy Pop & David Bowie - Low Idiots Lusting After Heroes
I have recently started a new sub reddit titled "Resequenced" - a place for people to discuss officially released reworked records (for example, Never Let Me Down), and to share their fan reworking of album sequencing. (Full spiel here)
I thought that there may be some people here who would like to take part in this community/ongoing conversation.
Low Idiots Lusting After Heroes
A post I've put together to get the ball rolling is based on compiling Iggy Pop & David Bowie's "Berlin" output together as a single album.
I'd love for you to check it out, and please let me know what you think!
submitted by warmcrystalwave to DavidBowie [link] [comments]


2020.04.30 12:38 warmcrystalwave Iggy Pop & David Bowie - Low Idiots Lusting After Heroes

Iggy Pop & David Bowie - Low Idiots Lusting After Heroes

Berlin Boys
(Might as well put my money where my mouth is & share an example of a comp!)
In 1976, David Bowie & Iggy Pop left The States in an attempt to kick their respective drug addictions. They relocated to Berlin and between July 1976 & August 1977 they recorded 4 critically albums together, but as solo artists. In order, they were:
The Idiot - Iggy Pop
Low - David Bowie
Lust for Life - Iggy Pop
"heroes" - David Bowie
This compilation imagines the 4 albums combined into a singular narrative, released as a single record "Low Idiots Lusting After Heroes".
The story is one of a couple of two spiritually lost friends who are seeking escape in debauchery, realising the love they need, and hopefully finding it.
The tracklist is:
  1. Iggy Pop - Funtime (The Idiot)
  2. David Bowie - Breaking Glass (low)
  3. Iggy Pop - Sister Midnight (The Idiot)
  4. David Bowie - What in the World (low)
  5. Iggy Pop - Some Weird Sin (Lust for Life)
  6. David Bowie - Be My Wife (low)
  7. Iggy Pop - Fall in Love With Me (Lust for Life)
  8. David Bowie - Sound & Vision (low)
  9. Iggy Pop - China Girl (The Idiot)
  10. David Bowie - "heroes" ("heroes")
I chose to alternate who was handling lead vocals to make it seem as much a collaborative album as possible, and made sure to include the only actual appearance by Iggy on the Bowie records - backing vocals on What in the World.
Let me know what you think!
submitted by warmcrystalwave to resequenced [link] [comments]


2020.04.15 03:03 Soul_Man2004 My 40 epiphanies, knowances and life lessons obtained from being a David Bowie fan for two years

  1. How to pronounce Andy Warhol's last name
  2. Unconventional music can be lovely
  3. The first David Bowie song I heard was Changes
  4. What anisocoria is
  5. The 1984 book's existence
  6. What that colorful lightning bolt logo's all about
  7. I really like soul music
  8. Any genre sounds nice if it's done right
  9. You can't say no to the beauty and the beast
  10. Even cool famous people've got idols
  11. The L.A. riots
  12. Don't brandish your differences – own them
  13. A red mullet can be pulled off
  14. Guy Peellaert has some interesting artwork
  15. The phrase "even a glass eye in a duck's ass can see that" exists
  16. Border police don't like pig fetuses
  17. About the spider heteropoda davidbowie
  18. Speak in extremes
  19. I should've watched Labyrinth when I was younger
  20. A few choice things cocaine will make you do
  21. You can be a chameleon in a changing world, but you don't have to blend in everytime
  22. What the Berlin Wall was
  23. Un Chien Andalou
  24. I like blonde hair
  25. I feel like I've heard Tin Machine's Stateside in a past life
  26. Mick Ronson is my favorite guitarist
  27. A song can make me cry
  28. The human body can be very formidable
  29. What a mod is
  30. Who The Who, Iggy Pop and Lou Reed are
  31. The Linguini Incident is hilarious
  32. Inspiration comes easy from being in certain situations
  33. I'd like to fully obtain musical maturity
  34. I have an affinity for saxophones
  35. I can sit through a ten minute song and enjoy every second
  36. Live albums can be better than studio
  37. I'm willing to learn a lot about somebody if I like them
  38. The title of that song I knew, but not the title of – Cactus by the Pixies
  39. I should watch the movie Cat People (and I have)
  40. He is definitely my favorite artist
I couldn't remember everything, but those are a few.
submitted by Soul_Man2004 to DavidBowie [link] [comments]


2020.04.10 01:00 pazur13 Iggy Pop, David Bowie, Coco Schwab in Berlin 1977

Iggy Pop, David Bowie, Coco Schwab in Berlin 1977 submitted by pazur13 to DavidBowie [link] [comments]


2020.03.26 19:35 televisingvegetables List of albums from flightless online sale

Ever since 168 opened I've been exploring the albums they post on their instagram, so this is like a dream come true for me.
There will be misspellings. I omitted a few better known albums.
EDIT: Dear god they added more today. I'll try to update the list today sometime.
ABDALLAH AG OUMBADOUGOU – ANOU MALANE
AFRO EXOTIQUE – ADVENTURES IN LEFTFIELD AFRICA
AIR – MOON SAFARI
ALDOUS HARDING – PARTY
ALEKE KANONU – ALEKE
ALICE COOPER – KILLER
ALTIN GUN – ON
ANGEL OLSEN – BURN YOUR FIRE FOR NO WITNESS
ANGEL OLSEN – MY WOMAN
ANGEL OLSEN – PHASES
ANGELO BADALAMENTI – MUSIC FROM TWIN PEAKS
ARIEL PINK – POM POM
ARIEL PINK’S HAUNTED GRAFFITI – BEFORE TODAY
ARIEL PINK’S HAUNTED GRAFFITI – LOVERBOY
ARIEL PINK’S HAUNTED GRAFFITI – MATURE THEMES
ARIEL PINK’S HAUNTED GRAFFITI – ODDITTIES SODOMIES VOL. 2
ARIEL PINK’S HAUNTED GRAFFITI – UNDERGROUND
ARP – ZEBRA
ARZACHEL – ARZACHEL
AUSECUMA BEATS – AUSECUMA BEATS
B BOYS – DUDU
BANK RECORDS – 2011-2016
BEHAVIOR – 375 IMAGES OF ANGELS
BEHAVIOR – SNAKES AND SHAPES
BIG HUGE – CRUEL WORLD
BIG YAWN – NO!
BILL CALLAHAN – HAVE FUN WITH GOD
BITCHIN BAJAS – BITCHIN BAJAS
BITS OF SHIT – CUT SLEEVES
BLACK LIPS – UNDERNEATH THE RAINBOW
BLANK REALM – LAST SEEN
BLASTED CANYONS – 2ND PLACE
BLASTED CANYONES – BLASTED CANYONS
BOB MARLEY – CATCH A FIRE
BODY TYPE – BODY TYPE EP
BRAINTICKET – COTTONWOODHILL
BRAINTICKET – PSYCHONAUT
BURIED COUNTRY – AN ANTHOLOGY OF ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIAN COUNTRY MUSIC
CAN – CAN
CAN – EGE BAMYASI
CAN – FUTURE DAYS
CAN – TAGO MAGO
CAN – THE SINGLES
CARAVAN – CARAVAN
CARLOS SAVINA – GRAND TOUR
CFM – SOUNDTRACK TO AN EMPTY ROOM
CFM – STILL LIFE OF CITRUS AND LIME
CHAI – PUNK
CHASMAN – SYNTH-E-FUGE
CITRIC DUMMIES – THE KIDS ARE ALT-RIGHT
COLD CIRCUITS – OUT OF HAT YAI
COLOSSEUM – VALENTYNE SUITE
CONNON MOCKASIN – CARAMEL
CREPES – IN CAHOOTS
CURTIS HARDING – FACE YOUR FEAR
CURTIS HARDING – SOUL POWER
CYANIDE THORNTON – CYANIDE THORNTON
CYBOTRON – CYBOTRON
DAMAGE BUG – COLD HOT PLUMBS
DAMO SUZUKI NETWORK – THE SWIFTSURE SESSION
DARK WEB – CLONE AGE
DAVID CHESWORTH – LAYER ON LAYER
DEATH - …FOR THE WHOLE WORLD TO SEE
DEATH – SPIRITUAL, MENTAL, PHYSICAL
DEATH’S KINGDOM – FIERCE MILD
DEMON FUZZ – AFREAKA!
DENNIS – THE ENTHUSIAST
DERYA YILDIRIM & GRUP SIMSEK – KAR YAGAR
DEVENDRA BANHART – MA
DHIDALAH – THRESHOLD
DIAT – POSITIVE ENERGY
DON HARPER – COLD WORLDS
DOUG TUTTLE – IT CALLS ON ME
DR. SURE’S UNUSUAL PRACTICE – THE WEST
DRINKS – HIPPO LITE
DUNGEN + WORLDS – MYTHS 003
EASTLINK - EASTLINK
EASY BROWNS – TRASH!
EDDIE RUSS – FRESH OUT
EDITH FROST – IT’S A GAME
EKO – FUNKY DISCO MUSIC
EL WALI – TIRIS
ELITE BEAT – SELECTED RYTHMS
ELLA FITZGERALD AND LOUIS ARMSTRONG – ELLA AND LOUIS
EMPAT LIMA – CLING CLANG CLUTTER
ENDLESS COLUMN – ENDLESS COLUMN
ERASMO CARLOS & OS TREMENDOES – ERASMO CARLOS E OS TREMENDOES
ERASMO CARLOS – CARLOS, ERASMO
ERIC SIDAY – ULTRA SONIC PERCEPTION
ETHERS – ETHERS
EX-CULT – CIGARETTE MACHINE
EXIT GROUP – ADVERSE HABITAT
F.J. MCMAHON – SPIRIT OF THE GOLDEN JUICE
FABIO FABOR – AQUARIUM
FABULOUS DIAMONDS – PLAIN SONGS
FATTY GEORGE UND SILKE SCHWINGER – TRIP
FEELS – FEELS
FERLA – IT’S PERSONAL
FOREVER PAVOT – LA PANTOUFLE
FOREVER PAVOT – RHAPSODE
FOREVERSON – 10 MONTHS
FORTY SEVEN TIMES ITS OWN WEIGHT – CUMULO NIMBUS
FOSTER SYLVERS – FOSTER SYLVERS
FOXYGEN – HANG
FOXYGEN – SEEING OTHER PEOPLE
FOXYGEN – TAKE THE KIDS OFF BROADWAY
FOXYGEN – WE ARE THE 21ST CENTURY AMBASSADORS OF PEACE & MAGIC
FUNKADELIC – FREE YOUR MIND
FUNKADELIC – FUNKADELIC
FUNKADELIC – MAGGOT BRAIN
FUTURE HAUNTS – RUSHMORE
G. WAYNE THOMAS – CRYSTAL VOYAGER
GABRIELLA COHEN – FULL CLOSURE AND NO DETAILS
GABRIELLA COHEN – PINK IS THE COLOUR OF UNCONDITIONAL LOVE
GARY NUMAN – TELEKON
GEORGIA SPAIN – PRECIOUS COMPANY
GIRLATONES – HORN IF YOUR HONKY
GOAT – REQUIEM
GOMORRHA – I TURNED TO SEE WHOSE VOICE IT WAS
GORDON KOANG X LILUZU – REMIXED
GORDON KOANG – MAL MI GOA / SALAAM
GORDON KOANG – STAND UP CLAP YOUR HANDS / ASYLUM SEEKER SONG / SOUTH SUDAN
GRACE CUMMINGS – REFUGE COVE
GROUP 1850 – PARADISE NOW
GRUFF RHYS – PANG!
GUM – FLASH IN THE PAN
GUM – THE UNDERDOG
GURU GURU – UFO
GOGGS – PRE STRIKE SWEEP
HARALD GROSSKOPF – SYNTHESIST
HARMONIA – LIVE 1974
HAROUMI HOSONO – HOSONO HOUSE
HAROUMI HOSONO & TADANORI YOKOO – COCHIN MOON
HARUOMI HOSONO, SHIGERU SUZUKI & TATSURO YAMASHITA
HINDS – I DON’T RUN
HOMESHAKE – FRESH AIR
HOMESHAKE – HELIUM
HOMESHAKE – IN THE SHOWER
HOVERIII – HOVERIII
HOTLINE – YOU ARE MINE
HOWARD ENYON – SO WHAT IF IM STANDING IN APRICOT JAM
IGGY POP – LUST FOR LIFE
ILIAN – LOVE ME CRAZY
ISS – ENDLESS PUSSYFOOTING
JAALA – JOONYA SPIRIT
JACCO GARDNER – SOMNIUM
JACK COOPER – SANDGROWN
JACK NAME – LIGHT SHOW
JAPANESE BREAKFAST – PSYCHOPOMP
JAPANESE BREAKFAST – SOFT SOUNDS FROM ANOTHER PLANET
JAY REATARD – BLOOD VISIONS
JESS RIBEIRO – KILL IT YOURSELF
JESS RIBEIRO – LOVE HATE
JESSICA PRATT – SELF TITLED
JIM SULLIVAN – IF THE EVENING WERE DAWN
JIM SULLIVAN – JIM SULLIVAN
JIMMY SCOTT – THE SOURCE
JOANNA NEWSOM – DIVERS
JOE MEEK & THE BLUE MEN – I HEAR A NEW WORLD
JOHNNY HAMMOND – GEARS
JUAN WAUTERS – INTRODUCING JUAN PABLO
JUAN WAUTERS – LA ONDA DE JUAN PABLO
JULY – JULY
KAREN DALTON – IN MY OWN TIME
KELLEY STOLTZ – QUE AURA
KEVIN AYERS AND THE WHOLE WORLD – SHOOTING AT THE MOON
KEVIN AYERS – JOY OF A TOY
KEVIN MORBY – CITY MUSIC
KEVIN MORBY – OH MY GOD
KEVIN MORBY – SINGING SAW
KHRUANGBIN & LEON BRIDGES – TEXAS SUN
KHRUANGBIN – THE UNIVERSE SMILES UPON YOU
KIKAGAKU MOYO – MASANA TEMPLES
KIKAGAKU MOYO – SELF TITLED
KIM FOWLEY – IM BAD
KING KHAN EXPERIENCE – TURKEY RIDE
KING TUFF – THE OTHER
KIT SEBASTIAN – MANTRA MODERNE
KOSMETIKA – POP SOAP
KURT VILE – B’LEIVE I’M GOIN DOWN… KURT VILE – SMOKE RING FOR MY HALO
KURT VILE – WALKI ON A PRETTY DAZE
LA MACHINE – PHASES & REPITITION
LAETITIA SADIER SOURCE ENSEMBLE – FIND ME FINDING YOU
LAETITIA SADIER – SILENCIO
LEAH SENIOR – PRETTY FACES
LEE MOSES – TIME & PLACE
LFZ – NAME PLUS FOCUS
LOVE – LOVE
LOW FLUNG – BLOW WAVES
LUCY ROLEFF – LEFT OPEN IN A ROOM
MAC DEMARCO – 2
MAC DEMARCO – HERE COMES THE COWBOY
MAC DEMARCO – ROCK AND ROLL NIGHTCLUB
MAC DEMARCO – SALAD DAYS
MAC DEMARCO – THIS OLD DOG
MAJOR STARS – MOTION SET
MALE GAZE – MISS TAKEN
MALLEE SONGS – SUBURBAN HOUSE
MARC MOULIN – SAM’ SUFFY
MARTIN FRAWLEY – UNDONE AT 31
MATCHESS – SACRACORPA
MATT BERRY – MUSIC FOR INSOMNIACS
MELODY’S ECHO CHAMBER – S/T
MICHAEL ANGELO – MICHAEL ANGELO
MICHAEL KIWANUKA – HOME AGAIN
MICHAEL KIWANUKA – KIWANUKA
MICHAEL ROTHER – STERNTALER
MICHAEL SENA – BALI HIGH
MIGHTY DUKE & THE LORDS – CARIBBEAN ROLLERAMA
MIKE DONOVAN – EXURBIAN QUONSET
MIKEY YOUNG – YOU FEELIN’ ME?
MILD HIGH CLUB – TIMELINE
MILDLIFE – HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE?
MILDLIFE – PHASE
MILK TEDDY – TIME CATCHES UP WITH MILK TEDDY
MINOR THREAT – OUT OF STEP
MOGOLLAR – MOGOLLAR
MONNONE ALONE – SUMMER OF THE MOSQUITO
MORT GARSON – MOTHER EARTH’S PLANTASIA
MSAFIRI ZAWOSE – UHAMIAJI
NANCY – A NICE PACKAGE
NEU! – NEU! ‘75
NEU! – NEU! 2
NEW BERLIN – BASIC FUNCTION
ORB – THE SPACE BETWEEN
OCEANS OF THE MOON – OCEANS OF THE MOON OCS – MEMORY OF A CUT OFF HEAD
ODESSEY AND ORACLE – SPECULATIO
OFEGE – HIGHER PLANE BREEZE
OFEGE – THE LAST OF THE ORIGINS
OMNI – NETWORKER
PAINT – PAINT
PASCAL BABARE – ENDLESS ROOM
PASTEUR LAPPE – WE, THE PEOPLE
PAT THOMAS & EBO TAYLOR – SWEETER THAN HONEY CALYPSO ‘MAHUNO’ AND HIGH LIFES CELEBRATION
PATTI – GOOD BIG
PAUL KELLY – POST
PETER MATTHEW BAUER – LIBERATION
PHAROAH SANDERS – TAUHID
PILL – SOFT HELL
PIPE-EYE – INSIDE/OUTSIDE
PLACEBO – BALL OF EYES
PLACEBO – PLACEBO
POND – TASMANIA
POW! – CRACK AN EGG
POW! – SHIFT
PRETTIEST EYES – POOLS
PRETTIEST EYES – VOL. 3
PRIMITIVE MOTION – WORLDS FLOATING BY
PRIMO! – PRIMO AMICI
PRIVATE FUNCTION – ST ANGER
PROFESSOR RHYTHM – PROFFESOR 3
PSEUDO MIND HIVE – ON SEERS & SIRENS
QUILT – PLAZA
RAT & CO – BINARY
RAT & CO – ONE UNO EIN
RIMAURI – DOC
ROB – MAKE IT FAST, MAKE IT SLOW
ROB – ROB
ROBERT LESTER FOLSOM – ODE TO A RAINY DAY: ARCHIVES 1972-1975
ROUGH RIVER – THE LEAVING
RUDIGER LORENZ – INVISIBLE VOICES
RUNNING – WAKE UP APPLAUDING
RUPA – DISCO JAZZ
SAGAMORE – CHARLEMONT REEF
SARAH MARY CHADWICK – SUGAR STILL MELTS IN THE RAIN
SCRAPS – TTNIK
SHANA CLEVELAND – NIGHT OF THE WORM MOON
SHANNON & THE CLAMS – SLEEP TALK
SHANNON SHAW – SHANNON IN NASHVILLE
SILVER APPLES – BEACON
SILVER APPLES – THE GARDEN
SKULL CULT – SKULL CULT
SLEEP DECADE – COLLAPSE
SMILE – LIFE CHOICES
SONNY & AND THE SUNSETS – TALENT NIGHT AT THE ASHRAM
SPIRITUAL JAZZ VOL 9 – BLUE NOTES : PART ONE
SPIRITUAL JAZZ VOL 9 – BLUE NOTES : PART TWO
STEAM HEAT – AUSTIN FUNK
STEPHEN BAILEY – 9
STEPHEN BAILEY – SILO
STEREOLAB – ALUMINUM TUNES
STEREOLAB – COBRA AND PHASES GROUP PLAY. VOLTAGE IN THE MILKY NIGHT
STEREOLAB – MARGERINE ECLIPSE
STEREOLAB – MARS AUDIAC QUINTET
STEREOLAB – PENG!
STEREOLAB – REFRIED ECTOPLASM SWITCHED ON VOLUME 2
STEREOLAB – SOUND DUST
STEREOLAB – THE GROOP PLAYED “SPACE AGE BATCHELOR PAD MUSIC”
STONEFIELD – BENT
STRAIGHT ARROWS – ON TOP!
SUN RA – OF ABSTRACT DREAMS
SUNFRUITS – CERTIFIED ORGANIC
SVEN LIBAEK – NATURE WALKABOUT
SVEN LIBAEK – THE SET
SWAZI GOLD – JEHOVAH’S WHISPERS
SYD BARRETT – OPEL
SYNTHETIC ID – APERTURES
T KAIL – SOMEWHERE, SOMETIME
TAMAM SHUD – EVOLUTION
TAME IMPALA – INNERSPEAKER
TAME IMPALA – LONERISM
TERRIBLE SIGNAL – TERRIBLE SIGNAL
THE 13TH FLOOR ELEVATORS – LIVE
THE 13TH FLOOR ELEVATORS – THE PSYCHEDELIC SOUNDS OF THE 13TH FLOOR ELEVATORS
THE 13TH FLOOR ELEVATORS – EASTER EVERYWHERE
THE AVALANCHES – SINCE I LEFT YOU
THE BEACH BOYS – PET SOUNDS
THE BLACK ANGELS – DEATH SONG
THE CHAKACHAS – CHAKACHAS
THE CONEHEADS – L.P.1 AKA 14 YEAR OLD HIGH SCHOOL…
THE DANDELION – SEEDS, FLOWERS AND MAGICAL POWERS
THE INTELLIGENCE – LIVE IN SAN FRANSISCO
THE LEMON TWIGS – DO HOLLYWOOD
THE LIVING EYES – LIVING LARGE
THE LUCKSMITHS – NATRUALISTE
THE MALLARD – FINDING MEANING IN DIFFERENCE
THE MALLARD – YES ON BLOOD
THE METERS – STRUTTIN
THE METERS – THE METERS
THE MONKS – HAMBUR RECORDINGS 1967
THE PEACERS – INTRODUCING THE CRIMSMEN
THE RESONERS – NO EXIT
THE SHIFTERS – HAVE A CUNNING PLAN
THE SOFT PACK – STRAPPED
THE STEVENS – GOOD
THE STROPPIES – THE STROPPIES
THE TRADITIONAL FOOLS – FOOLS GOLD
THE TRAPS – BOOM POW AWESOME WOW
TIM MAIA – DISCO CLUB
TIM PRESLEY – THE WINK
TIM PRESLEY – WHITE FENCE : I HAVE TO FEED LARRY’S HAWK
TOTAL LOVE – TOTAL LOVE
TRAD, GRAS, OCH STENAR – DJUNGELNS LAG
TRAD, GRAS, OCH STENAR – MORS MORS
TULLY – SEA OF JOY
TY SEGALL – LIVE IN SAN FRANSISCO
TY SEGALL - $INGLE$ 2
TY SEGALL – FIRST TASTE
TY SEGALL – FRIED SHALLOTS
TY SEGALL – FUDGE SANDWHICH
ULTIMATE PAINTING – DUSK
UMOJA – 707
UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA – IC01 HANOI
UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA – S/T
USELESS EATERS – RELAXING DEATH
VARIOUS ARTIST – EVEN A TREE CAN SHED TEARS
VARIOUS ARTIST – LITMUS OST
VARIOUS ARTIST – SEAFARING STRANGERS: PRIVATE YACHT
VARIOUS ARTIST – TEEN EXPO: THE CLEOPATRA LABEL
VARIOUS ARTIST – UNUSUAL SOUNDS
VARIOUS ARTIST – W2NG 89.9 FM
VARIOUS ARTIST – WAYFARING STRANGERS: GUITAR SOLI
VARIOUS – MONSTER SKIES
VARIOUS – SUNNY SIDE UP
VILLA ABO, DUO J&J – BRAIN CHARTER DISCO
W-X – W-X
WAND – 1000 DAYS
WAND – LAUGHING MATTER
WAND – PERFUME
WAND – PLUM
WARM BODIES – SELF TITLED
WELLS FARGO – WATCH OUT!
WENDY RENE – AFTER LAUGHTER COMES TEARS
WEYES BLOOD & ARIEL PINK – MYTHS 002
WEYES BLOOD – FRONT ROW SEAT TO EARTH
WEYES BLOOD – THE INNOCENTS
WEYES BLOOD – TITANIC RISING
WHITE FENCE – FOR THE RECENTLY FOUND INNOCENT
WHITNEY – FOREVER TURNED AROUND
WHITNEY – LIGHT UPON THE LAKE
WILD WING – DOOMED II REPEAT
WILDEST DREAMS – WILDEST DREAMS
WIZZZ! – PSYCHORAMA FRANCAIS 1966-71
WIZZZ! – PSYCHORAMA FRANCAIS VOLUME 2
WOODS – WITH LIGHT & WITH LOVE
YUSEF LATEEF – THE BLUE YUSEF LATEEF
submitted by televisingvegetables to KGATLW [link] [comments]


2020.03.09 00:20 5_Frog_Margin TIL Iggy Pop based 'Lust for Life' on the Armed Forces Network call signal, which he heard in a Berlin apartment with David Bowie...waiting for 'Starsky & Hutch' to come one.

TIL Iggy Pop based 'Lust for Life' on the Armed Forces Network call signal, which he heard in a Berlin apartment with David Bowie...waiting for 'Starsky & Hutch' to come one. submitted by 5_Frog_Margin to todayilearned [link] [comments]


2020.02.11 23:41 sto_sa The list so far for RSD 2020 (an ongoing project...)

List Updated to include RSD UK titles as confirmed in Long Live Vinyl Magazine.
These titles may not necessarily all be included on the US list, and further US-exclusive titles will be announced.
The 3 Pieces - Iwishcan William - 12” (Rogue Cat)
Ace of Base - The Sign - 7” picture disc (IK7 Records)
Acid Mothers Temple - Nam Myo Ho Ren Ge Kyo E - 2LP (Space Age Recordings)
Namja Akhtar - Five Rivers - 12” (Last Minute Productions)
The Alarm - Electric Folklore Live ‘88 - 2LP (21st Century Recordings)
Lee Alfred - Rockin’/Poppin’ Full Tilting - 7” (Cancer Records)
Alessandro Alessandroni - Ritmo dell’industria n. 2 - LP (BTF)
Alpha & Omega Meets the Disciples - Sacred Art of Dub, Vol. 1 - LP (Mania Dub)
Alphaville - Sounds Like a Melody - 12” (Warner Music Germany)
The Amorphous Androgynous - A Monster Psychedelic Bubble - LP (FSOL Digital)
Andy & The Odd Socks - Happy Birthday/Remember You’re An Odd Sock - 7” picture disc (CMG)
Annihilator - Triple Threat Unplugged - 12” (Neverland Music Inc.)
Archers of Loaf - Raleigh Days/Street Fighting Man - 7” (Merge Records)
Louis Armstrong - Armstrong in France LP (Dot Time Records)
Art Brut - Modern Art - 7” (Alcopop!)
Ed Askew ft. Trembling Bells - London - 12” (Tin Angel Records)
Asking Alexandria - Stand Up and Scream - LP (Sumerian Records)
B-Fax - B-Fax - LP (Disco-Ordination)
Badflower - The Jester Acoustic - 12” (Big Machine UK)
Chet Baker Trio - Mr. B - LP (Tidal Waves Music)
The Bamboos - Twenty Years 2000-2020 - 2x7” (Tru Thoughts)
Band of Pain - A Clockwork Orange - 12” (Dirter Promotions)
Bardo Pond - On the Ellipse - 2LP (Fire Records)
Robbie Basho - Selections from The Sounds of Avatars - LP (Tompkins Square)
Bastille - All This Blood - 2LP (Virgin EMI)
Batmobile - Big Bat A Go-Go - 7” (Music on Vinyl)
Jessie Baylin - Pleasure Center - 12” EP black and white marbled (New West Records)
Beck/St. Vincent - No Distraction/Uneventful Days - 7” (Capitol)
Gerry Beckley - Discovering America - 10” (Morgan Blue Town)
The Bevis Frond - Valedictory Songs - 2LP (Fire Records)
The Bevis Frond - What Did For the Dinosaurs - 2LP (Fire Records)
Joan Bibiloni - Selected Works: 1982-1989 - 12” (NuNorthern Soul)
Biffy Clyro - The Modern LepeModern Love - 7” (Warner)
Black Honey - Corrine - 12” (Black Honey)
The Black Keys - Let’s Rock - 2LP (Nonesuch/Warner)
Black Lips ft. Kesha - They’s a Person of the World - 7” (Fire Records)
Black Sabbath - Evil Woman, Don't Play Your Games with Me / Wicked World / Paranoid / The Wizard 2x7” (WarneBMG)
Tim Blake - Crystal Machine (blue vinyl) (LMLCulture Factory)
Blanck Mass - Blanck Mass - 2LP (Sacred Bones)
BMX Bandits - C86 - LP (Glass Modern)
Marc Bolan & T. Rex - Shadowhead: 1972-1976 - LP (Demon)
Bombs of Hades - Phantom Bell (2LP) (red vinyl, etched side) (Black Lodge)
David Bowie - ChangesNowBowie (LP or CD) (Warner)
David Bowie - I’m Only Dancing (Soul Tour 74) - 2LP or 2CD (Warner)
Boys Next Door - Door, Door: 40th Anniversary (red vinyl) (Rhino Australia)
Broken Bones - Dem Bones - LP (Fall Out/Jungle)
Peter Bruntnell - Normal For Bridgwater
Jake Bugg - Saviours of the City - 7” (RCA)
Sam Burton - Nothing Touches Me - 7” (Tomkins Square)
Canned Heat & John Lee Hooker - Hooker 'n Heat (yellow/brown vinyl) (LMLR)
Caribou - Swim: 10th Anniversary Edition - 2LP (City Slang)
Brandi Carlile - Black Hole Sun/Searching With My Good Eye Closed - 12” (Elektra)
Frank Carter & the Rattlesnakes - End of Suffering Live to Vinyl - 10” (International Death Cult)
Ron Carter - Foursight Stockholm - 2LP (IN+OUT Records)
Carter the Unstoppable Sex Machine - 1992: The Love Album - LP (Chrysalis)
Neal Casal - Fade Away Diamond Time - 2LP (Not Fade Away)
Johnny Cash - Classic Cash: Early Mixes [early mix of 1988 album] - 2LP (Mercury/UMe)
Michael Chapman - Americana - LP (Mooncrest)
The Charlatans - The Charlatans UK vs. The Chemical Brothers - LP (Beggars Banquet)
The Charlatans - Live It Like You Love It - 2LP (UMC/Island)
Charli XCX - Vroom Vroom - 12” color (Atlantic)
Cheap Trick - Out To Get You [live 1977] - 2LP (Legacy/CMG)
The Chemical Brothers - Surrender to Love - 12” (Virgin EMI)
Don Cherry - Cherry Jam - 10” (Gearbox)
Cherry Ghost - Beneath This Burning Shoreline - 12” (Heavenly Recordings)
Cherry Ghost - Live at the Trades Club - 12” (Heavenly Recordings)
Christine and the Queens - La Vita Nuova: Sequences 2 et 3 - 7” gatefold (Because Music)
Chromeo - Needy Girl: Zdar Dub / Paper Faces Remix /Album Version // Lifelike Remix / Bloc Party Remix / Instrumental (eOne Music)
The Church - Gold Afternoon Fix (gold vinyl) (Real Gone Music)
Gary Clark, Jr ft. Andra Day - Pearl Cadillac - 12”/etching (Warner)
The Claude Diallo Situation - I Found A New Home - LP (Dot Time Records)
Clearlight Symphony - Clear Light Symphony (pink vinyl) (LMLCulture Factory)
Clutch - The Obelisk - 17LP box w/mat and signed litho (Weathermakers)
MJ Cole - Madrugada Remixes - 12” (Classics & Jazz UK)
Shirley Collins and Davy Graham - Folk Roots, New Routes - LP (Universal/Decca)
Michel Colombier - Capot Pointu - LP (PlayTime)
The Comet Is Coming - Imminent - 12” (Decca)
Charly Coombes - All in the End Is Harvest - LP (Finyl Vinyl)
Alice Cooper - Live at the Apollo Theatre, Glasgow, 19-02-82 (Rhino/Warner)
Ivan Conti - Poison Fruit (LP+7”) (green vinyl) (Far Out Recordings) (UK)
Corporation of One - So Where Are You/The Real Life - 12” (Smokin’)
Nev Cottee - Stations - LP (Wonderful Sound)
Cradle - The History - LP (Modern Harmonic)
Mikal Cronin - Switched-On Seeker - LP (Merge)
Keith Cross and Peter Ross - Bored Civilians (Universal/Decca)
The Cure - Bloodflowers: 20th Anniversary - 2LP (UMe/Polydor)
The Cure - Seventeen Seconds: 40th Anniversary - LP picture disc (UMe/Polydor)
Denzel Curry - Bulls on Parade/I Against - 7” (Loma Vista)
Cybotron - Colossus - LP (Dual Planet)
Czarface - Czarface & The Return of Metal Face - LP (Silver Age)
Holgr Czukay, Jaki Liebzeit, Jah Wobble - A Full Circle - 2x10” (Gronland)
D-Mob - We Call It Acieeed Remixes - 12” (London Records)
Etienne Daho - Surf - 12” (Warner Music France)
Dalvanius and The Fascinations/Golden Harvest - Voodoo Lady/I Need Your Love - 7” (Warm)
Damaged Bug - Bug On Yonkers - LP (Castle Face)
The Damned - Fiendish Shadows: 40th Anniversary - LP color vinyl (Cleopatra)
Dave Davies - Rock Bottom: Live at The Bottom Line - 2LP (Green Amp/Red River)
Miles Davis - Double Image: Directions in Music (Selections from The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions) - 2LP (CMG/Legacy)
Divina De Campo - Decoded - 12” (PEG Records)
Def Leppard ft. Brian May and Ian Hunter - Rock ‘N Roll Hall of Fame - LP (UMe/Virgin EMI)
Mac DeMarco - Other Here Comes The Cowboy Demos - LP purple (Macs Record Label)
Devil's Witches - Guns, Drugs, and Filthy Pictures 10" (Majestic Mountain)
Destiny’s Child - Say My Name - 12” picture disc (CMG/Legacy)
The Detroit Cobras - Feel Good/etching - 7” (Wild Honey)
The Dickies - Banana Splits: The Tra La La Song 7" (Cleopatra)
Dinosaur Jr. - Swedish Fist: Live in Stockholm - LP (Cherry Red)
Dio - Annica - 12” picture disc (BMG/Niji Entertainment)
Dissection - Somberlain (2LP) (blue vinyl, etched side) (Black Lodge)
DJ Cam Quartet - The Essential - LP (Attytude Records)
Doctors of Madness - Dark Times - LP (Molecular Scream)
The Doors - The Soft Parade: Doors-Only Mix - LP (Rhino/Elektra)
Down N Outz - The Music Box - 12” (UMe)
Dr. John - Remedies - LP color vinyl (Get On Down)
Barry Dransfield - Barry Dransfield - LP (Glass Modern)
The Durutti Column - Idiot Savants (white vinyl) (180gr) (Demon)
The Durutti Column - Vini Reilly/WomadLive - 2LP + 7” (Factory Benelux)
Steve Earle - Times Like These/It’s About Blood - 7” (New West Records)
Clint Eastwood & General Saint - Stop That Train - 7” glow -in-the-dark (Greensleeves)
Luiz Eca y Familia Sagrada - La nueva onda del Brasil - LP (Vinilissimo)
Eddie & The Hot Rods - Get Your Rocks Off (2LP) (Jungle/Skydog)
Terry Edwards - Stop Trying to Sell Me Back My Past - 2LP (Sartorial Records)
Embryo - Embryos Rache - LP color vinyl (Loneos)
Embryo - Opal - LP color vinyl (Loneos)
Emerald Web - Valley of the Birds - LP (Trading Places)
Emerson, Lake, and Palmer - Live At Waterloo Field, Stanhope, New Jersey, US, 31st July 1992
Eminem - My Name Is/Bad Guys Always Die - 7” (Universal)
Brian Eno - Rams - LP (UMe)
Erasure - Blue Savannah - 12” (Mute)
Esplendor Geometrico - Necrosis en la playa - 7” (Geometrik)
Bill Evans - Some Other Time: The Lost Session from The Black Forest - 2LP (Resonance Records)
The Ex - All Corpses Smell the Same - 7” (Superior Viaduct)
Exit North - Book of Romance and Dust - 2LP (Exit North Records)
Ezra Collective - Clash of the Galazies - 12” (Enter the Jungle)
The Fall - Austurbæjarbíó Reykjavik Live 1983 - 2LP (Cherry Red)
The Fall - Cerebral Caustic: 25th Anniversary - LP color vinyl (Demon)
Fallen Angels - Paradise Lost - 2LP + poster + book (Sunbeam)
Fatboy Slim - Sunset (Bird Of Prey) 20th Anniversary Edition - 12" (SKINT)
Feeder - Feeling a Moment / Pushing the Senses - 12" (Echo)
The Feminine Complex - Livin’ Love - LP or CD (Modern Harmonic)
Field Music - Measure - 2LP (Memphis Industries)
Lee Fields - Let’s Get a Groove On - LP (Daptone)
Fight - A Small Deadly Space (gatefold) (red and black marble vinyl) (Real Gone Music)
Craig Finn - All These Perfect Crosses - 2LP (Partisan)
Kelly Finnigan - The Tales People Tell - LP (Colemine Records)
Flamin’ Groovies - Live at the Whiskey A Go-Go ‘79 - LP (Revenge Records)
Flawes - Highlights - LP (Red Bull Records)
Fleetwood Mac - Before The Beginning Vol 2 (3LP) (4/17 release date)
Fleetwood Mac - The Alternate Rumours - LP (Rhino/Warner)
The Fleshtones - Face of the Screaming Werewolf - LP or CD (Yep Roc Records)
Blaze Foley - Live at the Austin Outhouse - LP + 7” (End of an EaLost Art)
Josephine Foster - This Coming Gladness - LP (Fire Records)
Fraternity - Livestock - LP (Reel Music)
The Frumpies - Frumpie One Piece/Frumpies Forever - LP + 7” (Kill Roc Stars)
Future Sound of London - Cascade 2020 - LP (FSOL London)
Fuzztones - Lysergic Emanations - LP picture disc (Easy Action)
Serge Gainsbourg - Ces Petit Riens - LP (Ina)
Galaxie 500 - Copenhagen - 2LP/etching (202020 Records)
Rory Gallagher - Cleveland Calling LP - LP (Chess/UMC)
The Game - Born 2 Rap - 3LP (eOne Music)
Taana Gardner - Taana Gardner & Kenton Nix’s West End Works: Expanded - 2LP (Salsoul)
Gaston - My Queen - LP (Soul Brother Records)
Gemma Ray - Lights Out Zoltar! - LP pink (Bronzerat)
Gene - Rising for Sunset: 20th Anniversary - 2LP (Demon)
Giant Sand - Ramp - 2LP (Fire Records)
Freddie Gibbs & Madlib - Pinata - LP (Madlib Invazion)
Girl Band - Vicar Street Live - 2LP (Rough Trade Records)
Philip Glass - The Essential - 4LP (Music On Vinyl)
Glass Animals w/ Denzel Curry - Tokyo Drifting - 12” picture disc (Wolf Tone)
Goblin - Greatest Hits Vol. 1 - 2LP (AMS)
Golden Earring - Radar Love (original UK/Mootan LP version) - 7” (Music On Vinyl)
Goldie Lookin Chain - Original Pyrite Material - LP gold (1983 Records)
Gong - Live! At Sheffield 1974 - 2LP (LMLR)
Gorgan City - Realm - 12” (Virgin EMI)
Gorillaz - D-Sides (3LP) (WarneParlophone)
Gorillaz - G-Sides (2LP) (WarneParlophone)
Ellie Goulding - Lights: 10th Anniversary - LP (Polydor)
Davy Graham - The Holly Kaleidoscope (Universal/Decca)
Grateful Dead - Buffalo 5/9/77 - 5LP (Warner)
Gray - Never Gonna Leave New York City - 12” (Anasyrma)
David Gray - Please Forgive Me - 12” pink (IHT Records)
Juliette Greco - Jolie Mome: La muse de Saint Germain des Pres - 2LP (Poppydisc)
Al Green - Green Is Blues - LP, green and blue (Fat Possum)
Tom Grennan - This is the Place - 7” (Insanity)
The Grid - Floatation - 12” clear (Chemical Alley)
The Groundhogs - Split - 2LP red (Fire Records)
Grouplove - Broken Angel (Warner)
Guided By Voices - Hold On Hope - 10” clear (TVT)
Guided By Voices - Vampire on Titus - LP yellow/gold (Scat Records)
Marika Hackman - Any Human Friend - 10” (Virgin EMI)
Terry Hall - Home - 12” (Heavenly Recordings)
Johnny Hallyday - Le Plus Grands Succes - LP five-color vinyl (LMLR)
Halo - Let Me Do It/Life - 12” (Expansion)
Hanterhir - Schizophrenia/Dancing Out in Space - 7” (Easy Action)
Paul Hardcastle - 19: The Mixes (35th Anniversary Edition) - LP (Chrysalis)
Vladimir Harkonnen - Vlad Smash (Power It Up)
Hatchie & The Pains of Being Pure at Heart - Sometimes Always - 7” (Heavenly Records)
Hawkwind - At the BBC 1972 (September 28 1972) - 2LP (Rhino)
Hawkwind - Quark, Strangeness & Charm - 2LP clear (Atomhenge)
Kuumba-Toudie Heath - Kwaida - LP (Reel Music)
The Heptones - Back on Top - LP red (Burning Sounds)
The High - Martin Hannett Sessions (Unreleased Martin Hannett Sessions for Somewhere Soon) - LP (Vinyl Revival)
High Frequency - Summertime - 7” (Nia)
Aashid Himons - The Gods and I - 12” (Music for Dream/Fyraften Musik)
Hiss Golden Messenger - Let the Light of the World Open Your Eyes - 7” (Merge)
Loleatta Holloway - Cry To Me - LP (Tidal Waves Music)
Hope In High Water - Bonfire and Pine - LP (Fish Records)
Hugh Hopper - 1984 (red vinyl)(LMLCulture Factory)
Hootie and the Blowfish - Live at Nick's Fat City 1995 2LP (Warner)
The Hotrats - Turn Ons: 10th Anniversary Edition - 10" color vinyl [100 with signed print] (Demon)
Human Race - Human Race/Grey Boy - 7” (Gem Records)
Humble Pie - Official Bootleg Collection, Vol. 2 - 2LP (HNE)
Hunny - Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. - LP blue (Epitaph)
Ike Yard - Night After Night - 12” red (Superior Viaduct)
Implosion - 2020 - 2LP (Trading Places)
Inhaler - It Won’t Always Be Like This/Oklahoma (Late Night Edition) - 7” (Polydor)
Inhaler - We Have To Move On/Ice Cream Sundae - 7” (Polydor)
Inhaler - My Honest Face (45rpm)/There’s No Other Place (33rpm) - 10” (Polydor)
The Inn House Crew - Something Special - LP (Room in the Sky Records)
Ken Ishii ft. Pac-Man - Join the Pac - 7” (iam8bit)
J Hus - Big Conspiracy - 2LP (Black Butter)
Bob James - Once Upon A Time: The Lost 1965 New York Studio Sessions - LP (Resonance Records)
Bert Jansch - Live in Italy - 2LP (Earth Recordings)
Jansen/Barbieri/Karn - Playing in a Room With People - 2LP (Medium Productions)
The Jazz Butcher - Big Planet Scary Planet - LP (Fire Records)
The Jazz Butcher - Condition Blue - LP (Fire Records)
The Jazz Butcher - Cult of th eBasement - LP (Fire Records)
The Jazz Butcher - Fishcoteque - LP (Fire Records)
Jethro Tull - Stormwatch 2 (Warner)
Elton John - Elton John: 50th Anniversary Edition - 2LP purple (UMe/Mercury)
J.J. Johnson and Kai Winding - J&K: Stonebone (UMe)
Linton Swesi Johnson - Bass Culture/LKJ In Dub - 2LP (UMC/Island)
Daniel Johnston - The End is Never Really Over - 2LP (Feraltone) [features Artistic Vice and 1990]
Samantha Jones - A Girl Named Sam - LP (Trading Places)
Wizz Jones - Wizz Jones: Mono and Stereo Mixes - LP (Sunbeam)
Judas Priest - British Steel - 2LP picture disc (CMG/Legacy)
June of 44 - Engine Takes to the Water - LP (Touch & Go)
June of 44 - Tropics and Meridians - LP (Touch & Go)
Jungle Brothers - Because I Got It Like That - 7” (Idlers)
Damien Jurado - Birds Tricked Into the Trees/From Devils To Davis - 7” (Loose)
David Keenan - Alchemy & Prose: Live Recordings - 12” (Rubyworks)
Dermot Kennedy - Without Fear - LP (Island)
Tim Key - Tim Key’s Late Night Poetry Programme - 2LP color vinyl (Demon)
Phoebe Killdeer - Fade Out Lines - LP (Kwaidan)
Killing Joke - Laugh at Your Peril: Live in Berlin - 3LP black and pink (Killing Joke Records)
Killing Joke - Turn to Red - 12” red (Turn to Red Records)
The King James Version - He’s Forever (Amen) - 7” (Soul Kitchen)
The Kinks - The Kink Kronikles - 2LP red vinyl (Warner)
Klaxons - Surfing the Void: 10th Anniversary Edition - 2LP (UMC/Polydor)
Knight Area - D-Day - 2LP black and white (Butler)
Sarathy Korwar - Otherland - 12” transparent green (The Leaf Label)
Kraftwerk - 1 (50th Anniversary Edition) - LP (True Choice Recordings)
Kraftwerk - 2 - LP (True Choice Recordings)
Fela Ransome Kuti and His Highlife Rakers - Fela’s First: The Complete 1959 Melodisc Session - 10” (Cadillac Records)
Wolfgang Lackerschmid and Chet Baker - Ballads for Two - LP (Dot Time Records)
Laneous - Elsewhere/Flawless - 7” (Soul Has No Tempo)
kd lang - Angel with a Lariat - LP red (Warner)
kd lang - Drag - 2LP color vinyl (Warner)
Larkins - Hit and Run - 10” EP (Good Soldier Records)
Jamie Lawson - Last Night Stars - LP (Lookout Mountain)
The Leaf Library - About Minerals - LP (Where Its At is Where You Are)
Jenny Lee - I’m So Tired/Some Things Last a Longtime - 12” (Caroline)
Thomas Leer - Emotional Hardware - CD (Smitten Kitten)
Michel Legrand - Jazz on Film - LP (Moochin’ About)
John Lennon - Instant Karma 2020 Ultimate Remix - 7” (UMe)
Lil' Kim - 9 (Deluxe LP) (Ltd)
Alison Limerick - Where Love Lives/Frankie Knuckles remix - 12” (Arista)
Alfredo Linares y su Sonora - Yo traigo boogaloo - LP (Vampisoul)
The Live Band - A Cance for Hope - 7” (The Sound of Brooklyn)
Local Natives/Overcoats - When Am I Gonna Lose You - 7” (Loma Vista Recordings)
The London Suede - London Suede - LP (Demon)
Loop - Sevens - 3x7” (Reactor)
Loose Joints - Is It All Over My Face: 40th Anniversary Edition - 2x12” (West End)
Los Amigos Invisibles - Arepa 3000 - 2LP (Luaka Bop)
Lothar & The Hand People - Machines: Amherst 1969 - LP + CD (Modern Harmonic)
The Lottery Winners - Love Will Keep Us Together - 7” (Modern Sky)
Love Frame Tragedy - Five Songs to Briefly Fill the Void - 10” EP (Good Soldier Records)
The Lovely Eggs - I Am A ***** - LP picture disc (Egg Records)
Marcy Luarks and Classic Touch - Electric Murder - LP (Kalita Records)
Corb Lund - Cover Your Tracks EP - 12” EP (New West Records)
Kenny Lynch - Half the Day’s Gone and We Haven’t Earned a Penny / Ashley Beedle Remix - 7” (Satril)
Kirsty MacColl - Other People's Hearts: B-Sides 1988-1989 - LP clear (Demon)
Madness - Work, Rest, and Play - 2x7” (Union Square/BMG)
Magic in Threes - Stay in Your Lane - 7” (King Underground)
Magnetic System - Godzilla/Escape - 7” (AMS)
Magnum - Fully Loaded - LP (Phoenix)
Manic Street Preachers - Done & Dusted - 12” (CMG/Legacy)
Mansun - The Dead Flowers Reject - LP (Kscope)
The Mar-Keys - Last Night EP - 10” EP (Vinyl Revival)
Bob Marley - Redemption Song - 12” clear vinyl (UMe)
Nick Mason - See Emily Play/Vegetable Man - 12” (Legacy)
Sammy Massamba - 1990: Beni Soit Ton Nom - LP (SM Productions)
John Massoni & Sonic Boom - The Sundowner Sessions - LP (Space Age Recordings)
Paul McCartney - McCartney: 50th Anniversary Edition - LP (180g, half-speed mastered) (UMe/Capitol)
Tommy McGee - Now That I Have You - 12” (TMG Records)
Declan McKenna - Beautiful Faces/The Key to Life on Earth - 7” (Columbia)
Meat Loaf - Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell - 2LP picture disc (UMe/Virgin EMI)
The Meat Puppets - The Meat Puppets - 10” (Megaforce)
Mellow Candle - Swaddling Songs (Universal)
Melt Yourself Down - Born in the ManoIt Is What It Is (IDLES Remix) - 7” (Decca)
Membranes - Kiss Ass Godhead - LP pink (Glass Modern)
Menswear - Nuisance: 25th Anniversary Edition - LP (Demon)
The Menzingers - Chamberlain Waits - LP color vinyl (Red Scare Industries)
Metal Mirror - English Booze/Rock ‘n’ Roll Ain’t Never Gonna Leave You - 7” (On the Dole Records)
The Meteors - Teenage Heart - LP color vinyl (Music On Vinyl)
Metronomy - Metronomy Forever Remixes - 12” (Because Music)
Metronomy & Clara Luciani - La Baie/La Grenade - 7” (Because Music)
Mew - And the Glass Handed Kites: 15th Anniversary Edition - 2LP (Music On Vinyl)
Mickey and The Soul Generation - Iron Leg/Chocolate - 7” (GCP)
Mickey and The Soul Generation - How Good is Good/Get Down Brother - 7” (Mr. G)
Mickey and Them - U.F.O./Hey, Brother Man (GCP)
Midland - Live at the Palomino - LP (Big Machine)
Charles Mingus - Mingus Ah Um Redux - 2LP (Get On Down)
Thelonious Monk - Palais Des Beaux-Arts (Tidal Waves Music)
Moonchild - The Truth/Run Away - 7” red/blue splatter (Tru Thoughts)
Moonspell - Memorial (red vinyl) (Rastilho Records)
Bobby Moore/Sweet Music - (Call Me Your) Anything/I Get Lifted - LP (Soul Brother Records)
Christy Moore - Prosperous - LP (Tara Music)
Kip Moore - Slowheart/Underground - LP + 10” (Snakefarm Records)
Kevin Morby - Oh Mon Dieu:1 Live a Paris - 2LP (Dead Oceans)
Giorgio Moroder ft. Kylie Minogue - Right Here Right Now remixes - 12” grey (Good For You Records)
Morrissey - Honey, You Know Where To Find Me/Fantastic Bird/You Should Have Been Nice to Me - 12" picture disc (BMG)
Chuck Mosley - First Hellos and Last Goodbyes - LP (blocGLOBAL)
Motorhead - Ace of Spades/Dirty Love - 7" shaped picture disc (Warner)
Mott the Hoople - Golden Age of Rock n Roll (blue vinyl) (Madfish)
Bob Mould - Circle Of Friends - 2LP clear vinyl) (Demon)
Mouth Congress - Ahhh The Pollution - 7” (Captured Tracks)
Mungo’s Hi Fi ft. Marina P, Dennis Alcapone & Tippa Irie - The Beat Goes SKA! - 7” (Scotch Bonnet Records)
The Murder Capital - Love, Love, Love/On Twisted Ground - 12” (Human Season Records)
Roisin Murphy - Incapable - 12” picture disc (Skint)
Mush - Great Artisanal Formats - 7” (Memphis Industries)
My Chemical Romance - Life on the Murder Scene - 12” (Reprise)
My Life Story - The Rose The Sea - 12” (Exilophone Records)
Nahko and Medicine for the People - Take Your Power Back (Live) - 10” (Side One Dummy Records)
Qasim Naqvi - Beta - LP (Erased Tapes
Nas - God’s Son - 2LP color vinyl (Get On Down)
Milton Nascimento - Ultimo Trem - 2LP red (Far Out Recordings
Nazareth - Love Hurts/This Flight Tonight - 10” (Salvo)
Fred Neil - 38 MacDougal - LP green (Delmore)
The New Clarence Reid - Cadillac Annie/Tired Blood - 7” (Phil-LA of Soul)
New Order - Peel Sessions - 12” (Rhino)
Nihilist - Carnal Leftovers (white vinyl) (Black Lodge)
Nite People - P.M. - LP (Trading Places)
North Sea Radio Orchestra - I A Moon - LP (The Household Mark)
Notorious BIG - It Was All A Dream - 9LP box (Rhino)
Gary Numan with Skaparis Orchestra - When the Sky Came Down Live - 3LP (BMG)
The Obsessed - Incarnate (Ultimate Edition) - LP gatefold or CD (Blues Funeral)
Ocean Colour Scene - One from the Modern - 2LP (UMC/Island)
Oh-Ok - The Complete Reissue - LP (white vinyl) (Hhbtm Records)
OHL - Oktoberrevolution (Power It Up)
Ol’ Dirty Bastard - Return to the 36 Chambers: The Dirty Version - 9x7” (Rhino/Elektra)
Operation Ivy - Energy - LP (Epitaph)
OST - A Haunting Strip of Marshland: OST for Ness (Drew Mulholland) (Castles In Space)
OST - Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me - LP (Maverick)
OST - Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery - 2LP (Disney)
OST - Austin Powers In Goldmember - 2LP (Maverick)
OST - Black Mirror: Smithereens (Ryuichi Sakamoto) - LP (Music On Vinyl)
OST - C.H.U.D. II: Bud the C.H.U.D. - LP (Terror Vision)
OST - The Cinematic Orchestra/London Met Orchestra - The Crimson Wing: Mystery of the Flamingoes - 2LP pink (Disney)
OST - Henri Crolla & Andre Hodeir - Jazz on Film… - LP (Moochin’ About)
OST- Dennis Hopper’s The Last Movie - LP (Earth Recordings)
OST - Doctor Who - Massacre - 2LP “Parisian Blaze Orange” (Demon)
OST - Dracula/The Curse of Frankenstein (James Bernard) - 2LP
OST - Fistful of Dollars (Ennio Morricone) - 10” (BTF)
OST - For a Few Dollars More (Ennio Morricone) - 10” (AMS)
OST - Francis Lai - Made in France - LP (PlayTime)
OST - Fuktronic (Jimmy Urine and Serj Tankian) - LP (Music On Vinyl)
OST - The Godfather (Nino Rota) - 7” white (Silva Screen)
OST - The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (Ennio Morricone) - LP (AMS)
OST - Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: The Original (Demon Records UK)
OST - La Planete Sauvage (Alain Goraguer 1973) - LP yellow (Superior Viaduct)
OST - The Last Porno Show - LP (Country Club)
OST - Last Tango in Paris (Gato Barbieri) - LP rose (AMS)
OST - Metroland (Mark Knopfler) - LP (UMC-Mercury)
OST - Monty Python and the Holy Grail - LP picture disc (UMC/Virgin EMI)
OST - The Musical Anthology of His Dark Materials (Lorne Balfe) - 2LP (Silva Screen)
OST - Once Upon a Time in the West (Ennio Morricone) - LP (BTF)
OST - Paw Patrol - 7” EP dog bone white (Enjoy the Ride)
OST - Peur Sur la Ville (Ennio Morricone 1975) - 2LP (WeWantSounds/Modulor)
OST - Phenomenon - 2LP (Warner)
Piero Piccioni, Armando Trovaioli, Carlo Rustichelli, Nino Rota - Jazz On Film… - 2LP (Moochin’ About)
OST - Serpico (Mikis Theodorakis 1973) (WeWantSounds/Modulor)
OST - Shaft in Africa (Johnny Pate) - 2x7” (Dynamite Cuts)
OST - Synecdoche New York (Jon Brion) - LP (Fire Soundtracks)
OST - Terrahawks - LP (Gerry Anderson)
OST - The Truth and the Light: Music from The X Files - 12” glow-in-the-dark green (Warner)
OST - The Turning: Kate’s Diary (Music On Vinyl)
OST - The Virgin Suicides - LP (Rhino/Ryko)
The Pale Fountains - Longshot for Your Love - LP (Marina)
Pale Saints - Mrs. Dolphin - LP (4AD)
Parabellum - Post Mortem Live - 2LP red and black splatter vinyl (LMLR)
Paradise Lost - Live at Rockpalast - 2LP (Music On Vinyl)
Paranoid London - Paranoid London - LP (Paranoid London)
Bobby Parker - Soul of the Blues - LP (Rhythm and Blues)
Robert Parker - I Caught You in a Lie - 7” (Nola)
The Pastels - Advice to the Graduate/Ship to Shore - 7” (Domino)
Pennywise - The Fuse - LP orange and black (Epitaph)
Carl Perkins - Live In Paris - LP blue (LMLR)
Lee Perry and Black Ark Players - Guidance - 12” (VP Records)
Lee “Scratch” Perry and the Upsetters - Super Ape Variant - LP color vinyl (Get On Down)
Lee “Scratch” Perry & Daniel Boyle ft. Max Romeo - Horror Zone - 12” (Upsetter)
Pigbag - Dr. Heckle and Mr. Jive - 2LP (Call of the Void)
The Pineapple Thief - Uncovering the Tracks - LP (Kscope)
Pink Floyd - Arnold Layne (Live at Syd Barrett Tribute, 2007) - 7”/etching (Parlophone/Legacy)
Pinkfong - Baby Shark - 7” EP (SmartStudyCo)
Pluto - Journey’s End - LP (Morgan Blue Town)
The Pogues - At the BBC 1984 - LP (Rhino)
Marvin Pontiac (John Lurie) - The Asylum Tapes - LP (Northern Spy)
Iggy Pop - Kiss My Blood - 3LP/DVD/poster - (LMLR)
Iggy Pop and the Stooges - Russian Melodia - 7” (replica of French bootleg) (Revenge Records)
Natalie Prass - Natalie Prass - LP + 7” (Spacebomb)
Predatur - Seen You Here - 7” (On the Dale Records)
Elvis Presley - The Rock & Roll Collection - 5xEP (LMLR) [unofficial]
Elvis Presley - Elvis Prohibited - 2LP (LMLR) [unofficial]
Pretenders - Live! At the Paradise Theater, Boston 1980 - LP (Warner)
Primal Scream - Loaded: 30th Anniversary Editin - 12” (CMG/Legacy)
Prince Fatty - The Model ft. Shniece Mcmenanin & Horseman - 7” (Evergreen Recordings)
Ian Prowse - The People Not The Crown - 10” (Kitchen Disco Records)
Prince - Sign O' The Times - 2LP (Warner)
Tito Puente - Dance Mania Volumes 1 and 2 - 2LP (Poppydisc)
Asha Puthli - Asha Puthli - LP (Mr. Bongo)
Sir Joe Quarterman & Free Soul - Sir Joe Quarterman & Free Soul (Mr. Bongo)
Quicksilver Messenger Service - Happy Trails - LP yellow (LMLCulture Factory)
The RAH Band - Producers Choice - 2LP (Atjazz)
Raised Fist - Sound of the Republic - LP (Burning Heart Records)
Ramones - It’s Alive II - 2LP (Rhino)
Rare Pleasure - Let Me Down Easy - 7” (South Street Disco)
Raw Material - Raw Material - 2LP (Sunbeam)
Roy Redmond - Ain’t That Terrible/A Change is Gonna Come - 7” (Harlem Shake)
Lou Reed/John Cale - Songs for Drella: 30th Anniversary Edition - 2LP/etching (Rhino/Warner)
Winston Reedy and the Inn House Crew - Black Pearl - LP (Room in the Sky)
The Replacements - The Complete Incarcerated Live - 3LP (Rhino)
The Residents - Icky Flix - 2LP orange and yellow (New Ralph)
Gruff Rhys - (Don’t) Welcome The Plague As a Blessing - LP (Rough Trade Records)
Keith Richards - Hate It When You Leave/Key to the Highway - 7” (BMG/Mindless)
Minnie Riperton - Les FleuOh By the Way - 7” (Selector Series)
Robyn - Robyn - 2LP (UMC/Island)
Pete Rock - Petestrumentals 3 - 2LP color vinyl (Tru Soul Records)
The Rolling Stones - Metamorphosis - LP (UMC/ABKCO)
Tal Ross - Giant Shirley - 2LP (Tidal Waves Music)
Keith Rowe & Mark Wastell - Live at I-and-E (cover art by David Sylvian) - LP white (Confront Recordings)
Roxy Music - Roxy Music: Steven Wilson Stereo Mix - 2LP (UMC/Virgin EMI)
Freya Roy - Ahlke - LP (Vinyl Hunter Records)
Gene Russell - New Direction (transparent clear with heavy black swirl vinyl) (with insert) (Real Gone Music)
Sasha - Scene Delete: The Remixes - 2LP (Night Time Stories)
Sea Girls - Call Me Out - 12” (Polydor)
Shakespeares Sister - #3 - 2LP (Do Yourself In)
Shakespeares Sister - You’re History - 12” (London Records)
Anoushka Shankar - Love Letters
Ravi Shankar with George Harrison - Chants of India - 2LP red (BMG)
Sandie Shaw - Reviewing the Situation - 2LP (UMC/Virgin EMI)
Don Shinn - Departures - LP (Sunbeam)
Don Shinn - Temples with Prophets - LP (Sunbeam)
Situation ft. Andre Espeut - Beyond Compare Laroye Remixes - 7” (Situationism)
Edith Sitwell/William Walton - Facade - 10” (Moochin’ About)
Skatt Bros. - Walk the Night - 12” (Spaziale)
Skid Row - Slave to the Grind - 2LP red (Rhino)
Skye - Keeping Secrets - LP white (Skye)
Skyzoo & Pete Rock - Retropolitan Instrumentals - LP orange splatter (Mello Music Group)
Slint - Breadcrumb Trail/Good Morning Captain - 12” (Touch & Go)
Slowdive - Slowdive - 12” (Music On Vinyl)
Sam Smith - I Feel Love - 12” (Capitol)
Chris Smither - More from the Levee - LP (Signature Sounds)
Snapped Ankles - 21 Metres to Hebden Bridge - LP (The Leaf Label)
So Solid Crew - 21 Seconds EP - 12” EP (UMe/Craft Recordings)
The Soft Boys - I Wanna Destroy You/Near the Soft Boys - 2x7” (Yep Rock Records)
Soft Cell - Mutant Moments EP - 10” (Big Frock)
SOHN - SOHN Live with the Metropole Orkest - 2LP (4AD)
Soul Asylum - Hurry Up and Wait (exclusive 2LP+7") (Blue Elan)
Spacehog - Resident Alien (2LP) (cream with pink splatter "British passport" vinyl) (Real Gone Music)
Spacemen 3 - Threebie 3 - LP (Space Age Recordings)
Richard Spaven - Spaven’s 5ive - LP (Jazz Refreshed)
Britney Spears - Oops! I Did It Again Expanded - LP (Legacy/CMG)
The Specials - Dubs - 10” (Two Tone)
Spectrum - Forever Alien - 2LP (Space Age Recordings)
Devon Sproule - The Pink Noise - 12” (Tin Angel Records)
Stalawa ft. Junior Demus - Trad On - 7” (Foreign Mind)
Marker Starling/Ha Ha Collective - Slick Rock - 7” (Tin Angel Records)
Status Quo - Ma Kelly's Greasy Spoon - LP yellow and white “fried egg” (WarneSanctuary)
Cat Stevens - But I Might Die Tonight/alternate version - 7” blue (UMe/Island)
Storm Gordon - Diamond in the Heart - 12” EP (Wanderlust Productions)
Jackie Stoudemire/Al Stewart - Dancing - 12” (TAP Records)
Suede - See You in the Next Life - LP (Demon)
Sugarhill Gang - Sugarhill Gang - LP (Music On Vinyl)
Sumy - Funkin’ in Your Mind Parts 1 and 2 - 12” (Music On Vinyl)
Sun Ra - Egypt ‘71 - 5LP (Strut)
Supergrass - Caught By the Fuzz - 10” EP (Echo)
Surfer Blood - Astro Coast: 10 Years Anniversary - 2LP (Kanine Records)
Neil Swainson Quintet - 49th Parallel - LP (Reel to Real)
The Sweet Inspirations - The Sweet Inspirations - LP gold (Reel Music)
Gabor Szabo - Dreams w/ bonus tracks (gatefold) (Ebalunga!!! Records) (4/17 release date)
T La Rock & Jazzy J - It’s Yours - 7” (Partytime)
Jacqueline Taieb - Lolita Chick ‘68 - LP (Mad French)
Tailenders - #tailendersoftheworlduniteandtakeover - 7” (Bit Spicy That)
Tangerine Dream - Phaedra: 2019 Edition w/ bonus tracks - 2LP (UMC/Virgin EMI)
Tangerine Dream - Tyger (clear blue vinyl) (LMLR)
Willie Tee - Teasing You Again/Your Love, My Love Together - 7” (Gatur)
Tegan and Sara - Tonight We’re in the Dark Seeing Colors - LP violet and black splatter (Warner)
The Telescopes - Altered Perception - 2LP (Space Age Recordings)
Television Personalities - Some Kind of Happiness: Singles 1995-1999 - 2LP (Fire Records)
Tennis System - Fear of Knowing - LP (Graveface)
The Teskey Brothers - Live at the Forum - LP (Classics & Jazz UK)
That Will Be Lunch - Play That Funky Music White Boy
The The - I WANT 2 B U - 7” (Cineola)
Thin Lizzy - Chinatown - 2LP (Mercury/UMC)
Throwing Muses - Purgatory/Paradise - 2LP (Fire Records)
Johnny Thunders and Wayne Kramer - Gang War (2LP) (Jungle/Skydog)
Timeless Legend - Synchronized - LP (Expansion Records)
TLC - Waterfalls/Creep - 12” (CMG/Legacy)
Tom Tom Club - Genius of Live - LP (Nacional Records)
Peter Tosh - Buk-In-Hamm Palace - 12” (Spaziale Recordings)
Toto - Live in Tokyo 1982 - LP (CMG/Legacy)
Touchdown - Ease Your Mind/Aquadance - 12” (Record Shack)
Tyler The Creator - Cherry Bomb - 2LP red (Legacy)
Tyler The Creator - Cherry Bomb Instrumentals - 2LP pink (Legacy)
Tyrannosaurus Rex - Unicorn - LP color (UMC/Polydor)
U2 - 11 O’Clock Tick Tock - 12” (UMC)
UFO - Live in Youngstown '78 - 2LP (Chrysalis)
Ultravox - Sleepwalk: 2020 Stereo Mix - 12” (Chrysalis)
Underground Solution - Luv Dancin: 30th Anniversary - 12” (Strictly Rhythm)
Unrighteous Brothers - Unchained Melody/You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling
Marcus Upbeat/Laurel Aitken - Blue Beat is Back in Town/Boogie Rock - 7” (Blue Beat)
The Valentines - 1967-1970 - LP (Demon)
V/A - BBC Radiophonic Workshop: Four Albums 1968-1978 - 6CD (Silva Screen)
V/A - The Beat Scene - 2LP (Universal)
V/A - Behind the Dykes: Beat, Blues and Psychedelic Nuggets from the Lowlands - 2LP (Music On Vinyl)
V/A - The Blues Scene - 2LP (Universal)
V/A - Brazil 45s Box Set - 5x7” (Mr. Bongo)
V/A - Brazil Funk Power: Brazilian Funk and Samba Soul - 10x7” box (Soul Jazz Records)
V/A - Champion Classics - 12” box (Champion Records)
V/A - Cleveland Confidential - LP (Superior Viaduct)
V/A - Dance Craze - LP (Two Tone)
V/A - Detroit A-Go-Go - 10” (Detroit A-Go-Go)
V/A - Detroit Punk Archive Presents The End of the Night: 1976-1983 - 2LP (Hold Fast)
V/A - Doo Wop (Le Chante Du Monde)
V/A - Flow - LP (Mercury KX)
V/A - The Girls Scene - 2LP (Universal)
V/A - Hi Tide Groove - LP (Fat Possum)
V/A - Hillbillies in Hell Volume X - LP (Iron Mountain Analogue Research)
V/A - Jet Star Meets Hospital - LP (Hospital Records)
V/A - Kiss Kiss Bang Bang - 2x7” (Where Its At Is Where You Are)
V/A - The Ladies if Too a Slow to Disco Vol. 2 - 2LP (How Do You Are?)
V/A - The Land Of Sensations & Delights: The Pop-Psych Sounds of White Whale Records, 1965-1970 - 2LP or CD (Varese Sarabande/Craft Recordings)
V/A - Late Night Tales - new compilation
V/A - A Mickey Dread Production - 10” red, green and gold (Music On Vinyl)
V/A - The Mood Scene Vol. 2 - 2LP (Universal)
V/A - Music for Dreams: Summer Sessions 2020 - LP (Music for Dreams)
V/A - Nativity in Black: A Tribute to Black Sabbath (2LP) (gatefold) (transparent clear with heavy black swirl vinyl) (Real Gone Music)
V/A - Pin-Up Girls - LP (Vinyl Passion)
V/A - Psyché France, Vol. 6 - LP (Warner Music France Back Catalogue)
V/A - Pyramid Pieces 1 - LP (The Roundtable)
V/A - The Rock and Roll Scene - 2LP (Universal)
V/A - The Ska from Jamaica - LP (Trojan)
V/A - Studio One 007: License to Ska - James Bond and Other Film & TV Soundtracks (Soul Jazz Records)
V/A - Studio One - Studio First: From the Vaults, Vol. 2 - LP or CD (Studio One)
V/A - Studio One Rockers (green vinyl) (Soul Jazz Records)
V/A - Sun Records 2020 Compilation (placeholder name)
V/A - Sweet Relief: A Benefit for Victoria Williams - LP (Legacy/CMG)
V/A - Troubled Troubadours - LP color vinyl (Iron Mountain Analogue Research)
V/A - Wick Records Battle of the Bands Vol. 1 - LP (Wick Records)
V/A - You Flexi Thing, Vol. 6 - 7” (REPEA*T)
V/A - You Gotta Have Soul: Raw Sonoran R&B and Funk (1957-1971) - LP (Zia Records)
The Vaselines/Pooh Sticks - Split 7”: Dying for It - 7” (Glass Modern)
Steve Maxwell Von Braund - The Return to Monster Planet - LP (The Roundtable)
The Wake - Here Comes Everybody - LP + 7” (Factory Benelux)
Warmduscher - European Cowboy - 12” (The Leaf Label)
Warsaw Pakt - Needle Time - LP + 7” (Munster)
Roger Waters and guests - The Wall: Live in Berlin - 2LP cleat (UMC/Virgin EMI)
Geraint Watkins - Geraint Watkins & The Domniators - 2LP (Jungle)
Ben Watt w/ Robert Wyatt - Summer Into Winter - 12” EP (Cherry Red)
Mike Watt + The Secondmen - In Quintessence/instrumental (Yep Roc Records)
Norman Watt-Roy - Faith & Grace - LP red (Cadiz Music)
We Are Scientists - With Love and Squalor: Live in Woodstock 1969 - LP tri-color (100%)
The Wedding Present - Shaun Keaveny Session - 7” color vinyl (Hatch)
Whiskey Myers - Early Morning Shakes - 2LP (Snakefarm Records)
Whiskey Myers - Firewater - 2LP (Snakefarm Records)
Tony Joe White - The Beginning - LP white (New West Records)
The Who - Odds and Sods: Expanded - 2LP (UMC/Polydor)
The Who - A Quick Live One: Captured Live at the Monterey International Pop Festival - LP red, white, blue striped (The Monterey International Pop Foundation)
Widespread Panic - Sunday Show (Capitol Theatre, Port Chester, NY 3/24/19) (configuration TBA)
Ginger Wildheart - Excess GASS - LP (Round Records)
Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys w/ Miss Audrey - 1951 March of Dimes - LP red (BMG)
Jack Wilson Quartet ft. Roy Ayers - Call Me: Jazz From the Penthouse - 2LP (Century 67)
Steven Wilson - two reissues TBA
Wire - 10:20:00 - LP (Pink Flag)
Wishbone Ash - Live Dates II - LP yellow/clear blue (LMLCulture Factory)
Jah Wobble - A Very British Coup - 12” (Youth Sounds)
The Wolfgang Press - Unremembered, Remembered: Expanded - LP (4AD)
Wonk Unit - Sniffer Time/Bloodlust - 7” purple (PlastereCadiz Music)
Ronnie Wood and Keith Richards - The First Barbarians: Live From Kilburn - 3LP (Wooden Records)
Wu-Tang - An American Saga (Ltd)
Xterminator - Earth Feel It - 7x7” (Xterminator)
Yardbirds - Roger The Engineer: Expanded w/ 1966 recordings - 2LP color vinyl (Demon)
Neil Young - Homegrown - LP (Reprise)
Youth & Nik Turner - Interstellar Energy - LP blue (Youth Sounds/Cadiz Music)
Youth & The Slaves of Venus - Wooden Floor - 7” (Youth Sounds/Cadiz Music)
Frank Zappa - You Can’t Do That On Stage Anymore - 2LP (UMe)
Malena Zavala - La yarara - LP (Yucatan)
The Zoo - Presents Chocolate Moose - LP (Reel Music)
submitted by sto_sa to RecordStoreDay [link] [comments]


2020.02.09 01:02 eugray David Bowie and Iggy Pop getting on a tram . Berlin 1977

David Bowie and Iggy Pop getting on a tram . Berlin 1977 submitted by eugray to pics [link] [comments]


2019.12.10 13:04 decadesaccount 1970s

50: THE POP GROUP - Y
The 1970s - were they the greatest decade for music? In the aftermath of the Beatles, the album as a unified statement was an artform stronger than it would ever be - and that's why all the music here is so damn good. It also saw the full realization of experimental rock and jazz fusion, reggae entered the American mainstream, industrial and ambient were birthed, punk had its 1977 explosion that would change music forever, the memorable and cutting edge pop rock movement known as the new wave had begun, country saw new inspiration in "outlaw country," and hip hop was being born on the streets of the Bronx. There will never be another time like it.
So, as for the album that barely snuck in here - and I struggled when it came to deciding which brilliant album could claim the 50th spot - the Pop Group's Y may have been the "weirdest" post-punk album yet, and is a bit of a realization of everything to come out of the 70s; a fascinating mix of noise rock, free jazz, reggae, and funk; all sung by what sounds like a deranged Joe Jackson. And even if it may lack melody, when it does decide to groove, it grooves: could the seeds of the entire "dance-punk" genre have been planted in "We Are Time"? Swell Maps, the Fall, and PiL's Metal Box would all exceed it, but this was something truly original.
49: EXUMA - EXUMA
An odd, psychedelic folk album from a small Caribbean island, sung by a man with a larger than life persona. Across these seven surreal tropical tinged folk tunes, he makes you believe he did indeed come from the sky. The best song is its passionate penultimate track, "You Don't Know What's Going On" about, uh, our insignificance. Chill shit.
48: PUBLIC IMAGE LTD. - FIRST ISSUE
Whatever your opinion of the Sex Pistols may be, you can't deny that PiL were an innovative band. John Lydon wasn't gonna stick around waiting for punk to die, so he formed Public Image Ltd. and immediately moved on to post-punk. At the time, this was the strangest the genre had gotten with its lo-fi nine minute noise rockers, spoken word anti-religious rants, love song parodies, and free jazz piano playing. And if the Sex Pistols were your thing, there's a fair amount of punk rock still here.
47: THE ROLLING STONES - SOME GIRLS
The Stones waned significantly after Exile, but they did make a (brief) comeback in the late 70s with Some Girls. Now much less a blues rock band and more pop rock band, the Stones took influence from their disco and new wave contemporaries, and, rather than sounding out of touch, they kick a lot more ass than the almost all of their contemporaries. And fans of the old Stones still get some classics here in the hilarious country satire "Far Away Eyes," and Kief's memorable outlaw tale "Before They Make Me Run."
46: THE MODERN LOVERS - THE MODERN LOVERS
Jonathan Richman seems to be in love with everything, whether that be the new world or the old world or rock n roll (that one's probably obvious); and his lyrics are occasionally laugh-out-loud hilarious. You hear a lot about music that's punk in spirit but not in sound, while this may just be the opposite. Really brings out the optimist you are deep down.
45: RAMONES - ROCKET TO RUSSIA
There may be music we label as "proto-punk" but nothing truly was punk until the Ramones. And it's a bit funny, because they lack a lot of what punk became known for: they weren't political and they weren't aggressive, they were just four dudes having a good time making raw pop rock with joyously banal lyrics. And maybe that's the essence of punk. Regardless, every song on Rocket to Russia, their most consistent work, is undeniably catchy and endearing, and even a tad different from their debut as they work in a bit of a surf rock influence.
44: TALKING HEADS - FEAR OF MUSIC
Fear of Music stands as a bit of a transitional work, from the cold energetic art punk of their early work to the Afrobeat inspired post-punk of Remain in Light. That doesn't mean that this isn't their best work though, as it strikes the perfect balance of everything the Heads had done and it's by far their catchiest.
43: THE BEATLES - LET IT BE
I feel Let It Be has been wrongfully derided as the worst Beatles album. Sure, Phil Spector's famous "wall of sound" production isn't well suited for the Beatles and it is less artistically ambitious than the rest of their post-Rubber-Soul work; but hell, the Beatles were a pop rock band and this still has the amazing songwriting they were known for. Is it a suitable conclusion to the Beatles? I'd say so.
42: PINK FLOYD - THE DARK SIDE OF THE MOON
You probably haven't heard of this one, but it's a gem.
41: STEELY DAN - PRETZEL LOGIC
The first album where Steely Dan were less a band and more two songwriters and a bunch of studio musicians. It's a bit of a paradox in that it's both their shortest album and the one with the most songs. It may be less melodic than their other works, but what they bring here is eleven fun songs with Donald Fagen's best lyrics, especially on the touching "Any Major Dude Will Tell You" and the bigoted satire "Barrytown."
40: FELA KUTI - ZOMBIE
Fela Kuti accused the Nigerian military of being zombies, and it seems he wasn't wrong. This album may be a brief 25 minutes, but it leaves a stronger impact than a prog rock epic. The music may sound cheery - it is groovy jazz-funk after all - but its subject matter isn't. Following its release, the military stormed and destroyed Fela's commune, killed his mother by throwing her through a window, and nearly killed Fela by torturing him. Whether it did more harm than good is another question, but Fela said what he needed to say, and made another politically aggressive masterpiece in Coffin for Head of State afterward.
39: JOY DIVISION - UNKNOWN PLEASURES
Unknown Pleasures truly is as simple as post-punk gets, and perhaps that's why it's seen as the starter album for the genre. It's also why Joy Division would go on to much greater things on Closer, but the seeds are planted here.
Nobody in Joy Division was a magnificent musician in the traditional sense - hell, what can you expect from a group of working class elementary school friends? But they all brought something unique. We all know Ian Curtis wasn't the world's greatest vocalist, but his expressive baritone and depressive lyrics struck a chord with millions of listeners. When it comes to melodies, there may never be another songwriter as great as Bernard Sumner, but he also had a knack like no one else for creating an atmosphere - just listen to "Day of the Lords" where his guitar work makes you feel as though you've entered an icy apocalypse. Then there's Peter Hook's memorable bass lines that epitomize post-punk's unique use of the instrument. And then of course there's Stephen Morris, who they don't call the "human drum machine" for nothing. Everyone is firing on all cylinders here, and it's quite the engaging listen.
38: KING CRIMSON - STARLESS AND BIBLE BLACK
Upon acquiring John Wetton as their bassist and singer and Bill Bruford as their all time great drummer, King Crimson shifted their sound from jazz influenced to classical influenced, and this may be their most beloved lineup. Half a live album, half a studio album, and three quarters instrumental, Starless and Bible Black seems to be the black sheep of the Wetton trilogy, and seems forgotten compared to the two albums it's sandwiched between. Hell, the name of the album was even used as a chorus on the closing track of the much more oft-praised Red.
This is likely due to it being King Crimson's least accessible work, filled mostly with experimental jams. But it can also be their most rewarding, and at times truly beautiful in a way King Crimson's never been before or since - take the calm, hairraising instrumental "Trio" for example: never before has so much emotion been conveyed without words. What'll you find throughout the rest of Bible Black is sudden moments of brilliant pop songwriting that quickly burst into compelling jams. A remarkable, unique experience.
37: WIRE - CHAIRS MISSING
Like Johnny Rotten, Wire weren't going to sit around waiting for punk to die. Wire were already the artiest band of 1977 punk, so it'd make sense for them to join the first wave of post-punk. They quickly eschewed the values of "punk" and threw in synthesizers, raised the bass, made a few experimental rock tracks, and put a stronger focus on atmosphere and sophistication; all while retaining the minimalism of Pink Flag that made it so unique. And when they do decide to go punk rock here, it's done with a different, garagey edge that many modern bands recall.
36: FAUST - FAUST IV
Faust IV is likely Faust's most accessible work, which probably isn't saying much as it still opens with a twelve minute drone track. It did prove that they could write emotionally affecting pop songs though, albeit unconventional ones. In an odd way, it's more fascinating than their unhinged debut, with its ability to stimulate both emotionally and intellectually (which is surprisingly uncommon).
35: THE POLICE - OUTLANDOS d'AMOUR
Nothing to hear here expect some infectious, insanely catchy, summery, reggae influenced new wave with outstanding musicianship. It ain't as artsy as Ghost in the Machine or Synchronicity, but it was never trying to be. Along with Blondie's Parallel Lines, Outlandos was one of those 1978 new wave albums that would change the future of mainstream rock.
34: DAVID BOWIE - LOW
Ziggy and Iggy's lives were both so odd during this time that you could easily write a book about them, so I'll stay away from the that. All that needs to be said is that the title is how Bowie felt at the time: Low. You can likely deduce that much from listening to the cold, fractured, existential songs on side A.
But what makes Low truly great is its last five instrumental songs - the first of which being very different from the rest. After all the gloom that preceded it, "A New Career in a New Town" plays like a liberating new beginning, an infectious mix of harmonica and synthesizer that I never knew to be possible. But it's right back into the darkness on the following ambient tracks with Brian Eno. What's most shocking is that these ambient tracks - from 1977 - aren't the sparse, minimalistic electronic music you likely associate with the time. These are legitimately lush and haunting, and are possibly the most groundbreaking pieces of the era. But if you think Low was ahead of its time...
33: IGGY POP - THE IDIOT
...then this'll blow your mind, man. Of all the great proto-punk bands, Iggy and the Stooges were the best. So when it's 1977, he's finally making music again, and the genre he's been labeled the godfather of has exploded, what's Iggy do? Make punk rock? No, he goes to Berlin with Bowie where they invent the krautrock inspired punk music that would soon be labeled as "post-punk."
If that wasn't enough, there's industrial rock on this album - yeah, before regular industrial was even a thing. When you compare songs like "Mass Production" to the stuff Throbbing Gristle would be making two years later, it truly settles in what forward thinking people the great Iggy and Ziggy were. It's influence can be heard damn clear in Unknown Pleasures - I mean, Ian Curtis hanged himself while listening to it after all.
32: DAVID BOWIE - ALADDIN SANE
What is it with songs named "Time"? There are three songs named "Time" that I can confidently say are among the ten best ever made: one by Pink Floyd, one by Tom Waits, and one, of course, by David Bowie. It's a relatively goofy song, so it shouldn't move me so much when Bowie screams "We should be on by now!" but goddamnit I can't help it.
Aladdin Sane comes a few albums into his most well known period: his glam rock period. And despite its iconic cover, it seems to be the least talked about of these albums. Maybe that's because there's less to talk about; it isn't an ambitious rock opera like Ziggy Stardust or Diamond Dogs and it doesn't have several songs you're gonna hear on the radio like Hunky Dory. But it kills it in the songs department. Every song here is so damn fun (minus that awful cover "Let's Spend the Night Together"), and the odder moments like the title track and "Time" would certainly be a big influence on Station to Station. Overall, it's his best pre-76 album.
31: MILES DAVIS - GET UP WITH IT
Miles' final studio statement before seven years of retirement is far more than worthy of closing perhaps the most innovative career in music history. From playing bebop with Charlie Parker to being the key pioneer in jazz fusion, he changed the face of a genre more times than anyone else. Like two other albums on this list, Get Up with It is a double album composed of both new material and outtakes from previous albums. Hearing the outtakes, it's clear why they were outtakes, but not because they're weak; where exactly would the intense, repetitive krautrock inspired jam "Rated X" have fit in on the funky On the Corner? The nature of these outtakes wouldn't seem to lend them well to coherence in album form, as none of them would've fit. But here, paired with the rest of Miles' most adventurous tracks, they flourish in this "anything goes" fusion of jazz and regional music. There's the tropicalia of "Maiysha," the funk of "Honky Tonk," the surprisingly catchy electric blues of "Red China Blues," and the Afrobeat of "Mtume." It's also a statement of his evolution. Compare the mournful side long opener "He Loved Him Madly" to 1969's In a Silent Way, the genesis of Miles' fusion period (they're nearly the same length). Both are similar ambient works, but here Miles has taken things even further from what jazz was known to be before him, adding congas and more overtly acid rock guitar work.
30: BOB MARLEY - EXODUS
It seems Bob Marley's rootsier early work is more praised, but Exodus is packed with the iconic reggae hits we all know and love, like "Jammin'," "Three Little Birds," and "One Love." Marley's timeless mix of conscious political songs and personal love songs satisfy every feeling you could have and you're a damn robot if you're not moved. The best song would have to be "Waiting in Vain," maybe the best unrequited love song ever.
29: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN - GREETINGS FROM ASBURY PARK, N.J.
Bruce Springsteen definitely had a different sound going on on his first two albums. His debut is one of jazzy folk rock and nonsensical stream of consciousness lyrics that differ greatly from the amazing stories he'd later be telling. He immediately proved what a great singer he could be though, bringing tons of emotion to songs like "Mary Queen of Arkansas" and "Spirit in the Night."
28: CAN - EGE BAMYASI
Ah, the "normal" Damo Suzuki album. Is it the worst? Yeah, but these are some damn good funk tunes and they showed Can were as good as any funk band at making "normal" songs. And the two experimental rock tracks - "Pinch" and "Soup" - are as good as anything on Tago Mago. Also worth mentioning that Jaki Liebezeit's iconic rhythmic drumming was never better than on Ege Bamyasi, especially on "Vitamin C," where it's hard not to dance.
27: PINK FLOYD - MEDDLE
People always cream over "Echoes," and yeah, I get it, it's the greatest song ever made, no doubt about that, but like, why's nobody give a shit about the other songs? Did you know that Seamus is the dog? David told me that while singing a country song. How can we forget the only happy songs in Pink Floyd's discography like "Fearless," which ends with a football match for no reason; or "San Tropez," where Roger Waters of all people - I mean, you've heard the man's voice - decides to be a jazz crooner and sing a song about the beach? Not only are these happy songs, they're also warm and wonderful.
26: LED ZEPPELIN - PHYSICAL GRAFFITI
The last great album from Led Zeppelin would bring back the roughness and blues they seemed to abandon on Houses of the Holy, as well as further developing the prog rock elements they started playing with on said album. It may wane in its last twenty minutes, but its first hour is a behemoth of grimy, awesome hard rock. Both their dirtiest and artiest album.
25: WIRE - 154
Ironic that the album where Wire became more of a group effort with everyone writing songs also happened to be their most cohesive work. In a some ways, they'd become more conventional, and in many, they'd become less. The thing that defined Wire from the beginning was how different they were from the rest of '77 punk. We hear a lot about music that's not punk in form, but it is punk in spirit (e.g. the Stooges, the Velvet Underground). But Pink Flag may have been just the opposite. Was it energetic raw? Yeah. Did it have conscious lyrics? Yeah. Were its songs short? Yeah. But Wire were older than their peers, and there was something less angry and more logical about them. And as for the short songs - for other bands, it was fashionable, but for Wire, it was a statement. These weren't two minute songs, these were thirty second songs; and post-hardcore innovators the Minutemen certainly looked up to this aspect of Pink Flag. This unconventionality showed that maybe Wire were never really suited for punk, and instead they'd thrive in the coming post-punk. They didn't reach their apex for another two years, with their third album, 154, by which point they'd already evolved into an unrecognizable band. Their songs were slower, more developed, and often awash with cold, undated synthesizers; giving the album a feel of "post-punk, but if it were made by Kraftwerk." The lyrics were philosophical rather than political, which was fitting of its anxiously pessimistic outlook and futuristic aesthetic. I sometimes feel that post-punk as a whole still hasn't caught up, as I've yet to hear anything this atmospheric and absorbing - this is especially the case on "Indirect Enquires," when Newman (along with many other high pitched voices) scream "You'd been defaced!" repeatedly, over a low tempo instrumental with an incredible bass line and eerie alarm sound effects. It could really be the soundtrack to some shelved would-be-classic cyberpunk film.
24: TOM WAITS - CLOSING TIME
On Tom Waits' debut, it wasn't immediately clear that he'd become one of the all time great songwriters - his lyrics are occasionally a bit corny but they'd become next level on his second album. But when he does absolutely nail here is the mood, which makes this another album I find hard to ever tire of - the closing title track is beauty beyond words. And he did indeed immediately show us what a great singer he was, as he delivers each song with both a tiredness and a sincere longing.
23: GANG OF FOUR - ENTERTAINMENT!
If you've heard a punk song you can dance to that isn't by Gang of Four, then it owes its existence to Gang of Four.
An all time great band makes their debut here, and though it isn't as conscious or unique as Solid Gold, it's still incredibly assured for a debut. Metallic and minimalistic, it energetically rips it's way through twelve songs about sex and socialism. It isn't very eclectic and the only emotion it really shows is aggression (is horniness an emotion?) but sometimes that's all you need.
22: TOM WAITS - THE HEART OF SATURDAY NIGHT
Is it possible to tire of this album? Tom, his voice, and his lyrics make everything here acheingly beautiful, with poetic stories about love, homesickness, nights on the town, and lots of drinking. The nocturnal tone and jazzy blues instrumentation make this great for exhausted nights. Very different from the experimental rock Tom we all know, but equally great.
21: STEELY DAN - CAN'T BUY A THRILL
No amount of polish and precision could hide the fact that Steely Dan had already made their best album in their soft and sunny yacht rock debut. Of course there's no shame in that as this is a goddamn classic. The jazz-rock sound they're so known for is really only present on the iconic opener, but it's still quite interesting throughout as Latin, folk, and country influences shine through; and Donald Fagen brings some genius lyrics on songs like "Only a Fool Would Say That." If I ever wind up with a yacht, you can expect this album to go up twenty spots.
20: THIN LIZZY - JAILBREAK
In the hard rock world of Van Halens and AC/DCs, Thin Lizzy are a breath of fresh air. Rather than macho sexual tales, Phil Lynott brings well written and endearing urban stories of love and crime; and I can't not mention that they also rocked way better than anyone else. Honestly, who doesn't wanna go to Dino's bar and grill now?
19: JIMMY CLIFF - THE HARDER THEY COME
The soundtrack to the 1972 Jamaican film of the same name starring Jimmy Cliff (who also wrote and performed half the songs here), the twelve songs of The Harder They Come are some of the best reggae songs of all time, and the non Jimmy Cliff songs were chosen to create a "greatest hits of reggae" type soundtrack. Funny that the best songs still come from Cliff himself, in the longing "Many Rivers to Cross" and the uplifting "You Can Get It If You Really Want" and (of course) the title track. Endlessly listenable.
18: THE VELVET UNDERGROUND - LOADED
At this point, the Velvet Underground had fallen apart. John Cale had obviously left a while ago, but Moe Tucker also had to leave due to pregnancy and Lou Reed (who only sung about half the songs this time) left before the album had finished production. So it's a bit remarkable they churned out something this amazing.
The title refers to the contents: it was to be "Loaded with hits" (spoiler alert: Reed went back to working for his dad after its release). Still, it was their most accessible work by a mile. But just as he had a knack for experimental and garage rock, Reed had a knack for happy, charming pop rock. All these songs are as catchy as imaginable. It may not have been loaded with hits, but it should've been.
17: DAVID BOWIE - STATION TO STATION
The Berlin Trilogy receives a lot of fellatio, but it was just before on Station to Station that Bowie moved into the world of art rock. Taking the R&B of Young Americans and mixing it in with prog rock made this quite the unique album, and it has Carlos Alomar's best guitar work. Bowie was also in an odd way, and he sounds genuinely heartbroken on half the songs. When you feel like shit, this is a good one.
16: ROXY MUSIC - FOR YOUR PLEASURE
If you wanna know what you're in for when it comes to Roxy Music, just look at the artwork of any of their first seven albums - you're entering the world of Bryan Ferry, and it's one of nocturnal campiness, unfiltered hedonism, Their last album with Brian Eno, it'd be both their artiest and catchiest. Even by Bryan Ferry's standards, the lyrics here are bizarre, especially on "In Every Dream Home a Heartache" which starts as a calm, eerie erotic horror and ends in the most explosive guitar solo imaginable. They also take a fair amount of influence from their pals Can on "The Bogus Man" and the title track, and there's a lot of Stooge-esque sax infused proto-punk on the A side. I also have to mention "Grey Lagoons," a delightful blues rocker that's easily the catchiest song here.
15: THE STOOGES - RAW POWER
Raw Power brought a sudden change in sound for the Stooges that can be explained by an odd rearrangement of their lineup. Three years after Fun House, David Bowie stumbled upon a broke as shit Iggy Pop in New York. They were instantly friends, and Bowie brought Iggy to London with him where he promised him a solo career. Iggy began work on his new album with songwriting partner and guitarist James Williamson, but he found he didn't like any musicians as much as his old friends. So they called in the Asheton brothers, switched Ron to bass, and recorded Raw Power, an incredibly raw and powerful album - so much so that even the acoustic songs are as menacing as you're ever gonna hear.
14: KING CRIMSON - RED
The conclusion to the Wetton trilogy (and, for seven years, it'd be the conclusion to King Crimson). With violinist David Cross gone except on one song, King Crimson have mostly gone back to jazz-rock - but here they do it better than they ever had. At the time, it was to be their last album, and every song carries with it an indescribably epic feel; even the penultimate free improvisation piece "Providence" feels oddly ominous. The best song is, of course, the twelve minute closer, "Starless." The last thirty seconds are the most beautiful thing you're ever gonna hear, and the fact they chose that moment to end an era on just made it better.
13: THE ROLLING STONES - STICKY FINGERS
Sticky Fingers is easily the most depressing Rolling Stones song, as they were now writing songs that portrayed drug abuse in a much less positive light, and the songs that aren't about addiction are about breakups. It doesn't have as many great songs as Exile, but it does have it beat when it comes to consistency. There's also something quite a bit uplifting about listening to nine miserable songs and then hearing the end of "Moonlight Mile."
12: LED ZEPPELIN - HOUSES OF THE HOLY
11: CAN - TAGO MAGO
10: BOB DYLAN - BLOOD ON THE TRACKS
9: DAVID BOWIE - HEROES
8: PINK FLOYD - THE WALL
7: THE ROLLING STONES - EXILE ON MAIN ST.
6: PUBLIC IMAGE LTD. - METAL BOX
5: CAN - FUTURE DAYS
4: THE CLASH - THE CLASH
3: THE CLASH - LONDON CALLING
2: IGGY POP - THE IDIOT
1: THE STOOGES - FUN HOUSE
submitted by decadesaccount to u/decadesaccount [link] [comments]


2019.11.14 20:52 creature_fear12 [For Sale] $10/$15 Sale - AC/DC, Black Sabbath, Dylan, Fleetwood, Hendrix, Lennon, Marillion, Petty, Pogues, Runaways, Rush, Patti Smith Group, Neil Young + More

Cleaning out the shelves and parting with the following stuff today. Shipping within the US is a flat rate of $5, no matter how many you buy - ships via USPS media mail with tracking. Payments through PayPal only please.
All items graded as (Vinyl/Cover)
$10 LPs
AC/DC - '74 Jailbreak (Strong VG/VG)
Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe ‎– Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe (VG+/Strong VG)
Angst - Mending Wall (VG+/Strong VG)
Axe ‎– Nemesis (VG+/VG+)
The B-52's - The B-52's (Strong VG/VG)
Big Brother And The Holding Company - Cheap Thrills (VG+/VG+; Early reissue)
Black Sabbath - Attention! Black Sabbath Volume One (VG+/Strong VG)
Peter Baumann - Trans Harmonic Nights (VG+/VG; Great Ambient/Berlin-School LP)
Martin Denny - Hypnotique (Strong VG/VG)
The Doors - An American Prayer (VG+/Strong VG)
Bob Dylan - Nashville Skyline (VG+/VG)
Lita Ford ‎– Dancin' On The Edge (Strong VG/VG)
The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Are You Experienced (Strong VG/VG; 70's reissue)
Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange OST - (Strong VG/VG)
Lightnin' Hopkins - Autobiography In Blues (VG+/VG)
Lynyrd Skynyrd ‎– Street Survivors (VG/VG; Original 'fire' cover)
Marillion - Script For A Jester's Tear (VG+/Strong VG)
Marillion ‎– Fugazi (VG+/Strong VG)
Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark - Dazzle Ships (VG+/VG+)
Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - Damn The Torpedoes (VG+/VG)
The Pogues - Peace & Love (VG+/Strong VG)
Iggy Pop ‎– TV Eye 1977 Live (Strong VG all around)
Linda Ronstadt - Canciones De Mi Padre (VG+/Strong VG)
The Runaways ‎– Little Lost Girls (VG+, Picture Disc)
Rush - 2112 (VG/VG)
Rush - Moving Pictures (VG/VG)
Joe Satriani ‎– Not Of This Earth (VG+/Strong VG; Blue vinyl)
Klaus Schulze ‎– Mindphaser (VG+/Strong VG)
Sex Pistols - The Great Rock N Roll Swindle (VG/VG)
Patti Smith Group - Easter (Strong VG/VG; Club issue)
Patti Smith Group ‎– Radio Ethiopia (VG+/VG)
Patti Smith Group - Wave (Strong VG all around)
Styx - Styx (VG+/VG)
Various - The Rough Guide To Latin Psychedelia (VG+/VG+)
Various - The Rough Guide To Psychedelic Brazil (VG+/VG+)
Yaz - Upstairs At Eric's (Strong VG/VG)
Yesterday And Today ‎– Yesterday And Today (Strong VG/VG)
Neil Young - Neil Young (VG+/VG; Early reissue)
Neil Young - After The Gold Rush (VG+/VG+; Early reissue)
$15 LPs
Aerosmith - Aerosmith (VG+/VG; Original US pressing - NOT a misprint copy)
Black Sabbath - Paranoid (VG+/VG; Late 70's reissue)
Black Sabbath - The Eternal Idol (VG+/Strong VG)
Budgie - Bandolier (VG+/VG)
Elf - Trying To Burn The Sun (VG+/VG; Ronnie James Dio)
Fleetwood Mac - Rumours (Strong VG/VG; Original US pressing)
The Flamin' Groovies - Flamingo (VG+/VG; Early reissue)
Billie Holiday - Lady In Satin (Very strong VG all around, still in shrink. Original US mono 6-eye pressing, really nice copy!)
Nektar - A Tab In The Ocean (VG+/Strong VG; German press)
Plasmatics ‎– Beyond The Valley Of 1984 (VG+/VG+)
R.E.M. ‎– Reckoning (VG/VG)
Linda Ronstadt - Live At The Roxy (VG+/VG; Vintage bootleg)
The Runaways - Queens Of Noise (Strong VG/VG)
The Runaways - And Now... The Runaways (VG+/Strong VG; UK press)
Steel Pulse - True Democracy (VG+/VG)
Sly Stone ‎– I'm Just Like You: Sly's Stone Flower 1969-70 (NM/VG+)
Van Der Graaf Generator - Still Life (VG+/VG)
The Vaughan Brothers - Family Style (VG+/Strong VG)
Stevie Ray Vaughan And Double Trouble - Live Alive (Strong VG/VG)
Andrew Lloyd Webber - The Phantom Of The Opera OST (Strong VG/VG; Includes booklet)
submitted by creature_fear12 to VinylCollectors [link] [comments]


2019.11.09 16:16 willrjmarshall Looking for the Warren Ellis to my Nick Cave

(OK; I’ll admit this title is a tad ridiculous, but I’m trying to find a pithy way to communicate what I’m looking for)
My name is Will; I’m a songwriter, singer, engineer and producer from New Zealand, now living in Greenpoint. I’m a full-time musician, and I’m working on an art-rock project called Noise.
This is currently a studio project; I’ve just finished mixing the first three singles, and I’ll be diving back into experimentation and songwriting over the winter.
My influences are pretty diverse, but I could reasonably describe Noise as “dark, post-punk-inflected, literary art-rock”. I’m particularly informed by artists like Nick Cave, St Vincent, Jeff Buckley, Benjamin Clementine, Swans, the National, Bill Callahan, Berlin-era Bowie, recent Iggy Pop, Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell, Nine Inch Nails, and Beck.
While I’m perfectly happy working solo, I’d absolutely love to find a writing partner. Ideally you’d be a badass instrumentalist with a strong creative voice, a deep understanding of composition and arrangement, and an enthusiasm for exploring this general creative territory.
I’m not looking for any specific instrumentation, although I default to guitar, piano, drums and bass. Fundamentally, I’m interested in creative chemistry, friendship and a shared work ethic!
Does this sound like you?
Here are a few miscellaneous details about me that might seem relevant:
submitted by willrjmarshall to NYCJam [link] [comments]


2019.10.29 01:45 DieHermetischeGarage Podcast-PlayList vom Montag, 28.10.2019

Die gesamte Tages-PlayList
Tagestipps
Sendung Titel
BR Zuendfunk Climate Justice Now! Wie viel Umsturz steckt in Fridays for Future? (1)
BR Wissen Gründung der DDR - Auferstanden aus Ruinen? (2)
SWR Zeitwort 28.10.1945: Der Kriegsgefangene Fritz Walter wird entlassen (3)
WDR Zeitzeichen Bernhard Wicki, Schauspieler (Geburtstag 28.10.1919) (4)
News
Zeit Titel wo min
06:17 Porträt der Reformationszeit - Schweizer Historiendrama 'Zwingli' (Mäurer, Dietrich Karl) DRK 3:11 ?
07:23 Interview mit Jürgen Hardt zu Außenminister Maas düpiert AKKs Syrien-Plan (Barenberg, Jasper) DLF 11:48 ?
07:52 US-Reaktionen auf Tod von IS-Chef al-Baghdadi (Buttler, Martina) DLF 3:04 ?
10:08 Bosnische und kroatische Reaktionen auf Handke (Adler, Sabine) DRK 5:40 ?
11:41 'Not far from here' - Die Pianistin Julia Hülsmann erweitert ihre Klangfarben (Hülsmann, Julia) DRK 9:43 ?
12:40 Trumps Triumph-Moment mit al-Bagdadi : Demütigung als Stilmittel der Politik? (Schumacher, Hajo) DRK 4:44 ?
13:26 Zeit für ungeübte Koalitionen - Regierungsbildung in Thüringen (Länderreport) (Bernhard, Henry) DRK 7:27 ?
13:36 Christine Lagarde - erste Frau an der EZB-Spitze (Kostolnik, Barbara) DLF 3:28 ?
14:38 Bait 'Ein Film, den man nicht nur sieht, sondern fühlt' (Wollner, Anna) DRK 4:39 ?
15:09 'SoundBetter': Spotify will Tracks von KünstlerInnen 'verbessern' (Dryhurst, Mathew) DRK 8:15 ?
15:10 Kapitalismus-Dystopie in fremden Welten - Das Computerspiel 'The Outer Worlds' (Schiffer, Christian) DLF 4:27 ?
15:36 Mit Journalismus gegen Desinformation: Zuckerberg startet Facebook News (Schneider, Annika) DLF 4:56 ?
15:41 Zwischen den Fronten: Facebook hat jetzt auch die Demokraten gegen sich (Baetz, Brigitte) DLF 3:49 ?
15:45 Winselnder Tod im Tunnel: Viele Medien übernehmen Trumps Framing (Wehling, Elisabeth) DLF 2:45 ?
15:53 Alte Schätzchen: Der SWR öffnet sein Fernseharchiv (Paal, Gabor) DLF 5:09 ?
16:08 Albumkritik: 'Jesus Is King' von Kanye West (Balzer, Jens) (x) DRK 9:54 ?
16:22 John le Carré: 'Federball' (Reimers, Kirsten) DLF 7:28 ?
16:37 Soundscout: Yunus aus Hannover (Poppendieck, Kerstin) DRK 4:06 ?
16:44 Das muss man gehört haben... oder auch nicht: Weltmusik (Hochweis, Olga) DRK 4:51 ?
16:45 50 Jahre Internet: Als das erste Datenpaket auf Reisen ging (Kloiber, Manfred) DLF 4:44 ?
18:09 Was Syrer und Iraker zum Tod Al-Bagdadis sagen (Kühntopp, Carsten) DRK 3:24 ?
18:15 Nach CDU-Debakel - Berliner Reaktionen auf Wahl in Thüringen (Capellan, Frank) DLF 3:46 ?
18:18 Nach der Brexit-Verschiebung: Kommt jetzt die Neuwahl in Großbritannien? (Meurer, Friedbert) DRK 4:43 ?
18:30 Argentinien nach Fernández-Sieg - Devisenkontrollen werden verschärft (Herrberg, Anne) DLF 2:59 ?
18:36 Britisches Unterhaus stimmt über vorgezogene Neuwahlen im Dezember ab (Heuer, Christine) DLF 3:21 ?
18:40 Unterwegs in Libyen - Alltag in einem gescheiterten Staat (Allmeling, Anne) DLF 18:34 ?
19:05 Zwangsarbeit - Wie unser Lebensstil moderne Sklaverei mit verursacht (Sontheimer, Leonie) DRK 6:22 ?
19:08 Nach Thüringen-Wahl: CDU und SPD in der Klemme (Finthammer, Volker) DLF 3:12 ?
19:20 James Bridle - 'New Dark Age' (Fromm, Thomas) DLF 5:32 ?
19:25 Barbara Tuchman - 'Die Torheit der Regierenden: von Troja bis Vietnam' (Ehring, Georg) DLF 7:04 ?
19:40 Pierre Christin, Philippe Aymond - 'Ost - West. Eine Biographie' (Longerich, Melanie) DLF 7:44 ?
22:55 Baseball: Buh-Rufe für Trump beim 5. Spiel der World Series (Kößler, Thilo) DLF 1:59 ?
23:11 Keine Koalition mit der Linken - Thüringer CDU bekräftigt ursprüngliiche Haltung (Bernhard, Henry) DLF 3:42
Infos
(#) Info
(1) Fridays for Future: Was als kleiner Schülerprotest begann, ist eine weltweite Bewegung geworden. Wohin entwickelt sie sich? Der Zündfunk Generator fragt danach, wie viel System Change in der Klimabewegung steckt.
(2) Die DDR hatte nicht die Chance, aus den Ruinen des Zweiten Weltkrieges als demokratischer Staat hervorzugehen. Stattdessen entwickelte sich bis zur Gründung 1949 eine neue Diktatur.
(3) 28.10.1945: Der Kriegsgefangene Fritz Walter wird entlassen
(4) 1938 ließ sich Bernhard Wicki als Schauspieler in Berlin ausbilden. Er wurde verhaftet, weil er ein Mitglied in der kommunistisch orientierten 'Bündischen Jugend' war. Zehn Monate verbrachte er als politischer Häftling im KZ Sachsenhausen. Nach seiner Entlassung spielte er Theater. Autor: Detlef Wulke
(x) Jens Balzer ist definitiv ein debiler Spacko, den ich hier nie wieder posten werden. Das hier lasse ich nur stehen, damit man meine Entscheidung nachvollziehen kann. WAS FÜR EIN IDIOT! "Das finde ich jetzt ein bißchen unfair!" (o-ton, balzer, der selbe, der unlängst noch mit gierigen fingern stories ausgrub, in denen bowie und iggy pop in den 70ern unter 17jährige teenies vögelten ...) halt's maul, jens.
submitted by DieHermetischeGarage to DasOhrIstDerWeg [link] [comments]


2019.10.27 03:47 PapayaSF Iggy Pop in Berlin, 1979

Iggy Pop in Berlin, 1979 submitted by PapayaSF to OldSchoolCelebs [link] [comments]


2019.10.27 03:26 PapayaSF Iggy Pop in Berlin, 1979

Iggy Pop in Berlin, 1979 submitted by PapayaSF to OldSchoolCool [link] [comments]


2019.10.19 16:13 DungeonessSpit The 50 best albums of the 80s

50: MINUTEMEN - WHAT MAKES A MAN START FIRES?
I wrote another one of these that had some problems, so I decided to correct it. Narrowing this down to just fifty albums was excruciating for me. There is so, so much great music from the 80s that I wanted to make a top hundred (or more) but alas, that is too many characters for one Reddit post. As a result, every album here is one I love dearly. So without further ado, I'll get into it. To me, the 80s were the last decade to feature massive amounts of innovation. Sure new genres appeared in the 90s, but nothing as significant as electronic music turning into pop or hip hop entering the mainstream. And while the Minutemen are absolutely popular among music fans, they're overlooked when it comes to their originality. Some fools would assume that longer songs tend to be more complex and better, but the Minutemen say fuck that and add complexity by coming up with phenomenal melodies, only using them for a minute and a half while still fully developing the song, and then storming into the next energetic burst of a song. Most are going to point you to the nearly as good Double Nickels on the Dime but What Makes a Man Start Fires? is where they do what they do best... the best.
49: PIXIES - COME ON PILGRIM
I guess I've always associated alternative rock with a certain type of blandness, and the Pixies are often considered to be among the pioneers of modern "alternative" rock (their quiet / loud dynamic would be quite popular among grunge bands). However, I've always felt that there's something that separates the Pixies from their countless imitators. Could be their occasional bursts into noise rock, or maybe Black's unique voice and outlandish lyrics involving sci-fi and lots of incest. Anyway, I like my Pixies raw, noisy, and energetic; and they never elucidate these qualities more than on their debut EP Come on Pilgrim, composed of demos recorded in 1987. But for demos, these are all crisp and fully developed songs, especially the instantly catchy "The Holiday Song," and the folkish "Nimrod's Son."
48: GLENN BRANCA - THE ASCENSION
The Ascension is a no wave album by modern classical composer Glenn Branca... and it sounds like what you'd expect: an intense symphony of angry distorted guitars. With it being a rock album that completely ignores traditional rock structures, it would certainly be an influence on future post-rock and it uniquely explored the possibilities that several guitars present in a way that hadn't been done.
47: JULEE CRUISE - FLOATING INTO THE NIGHT
Written by David Lynch and Angelo Badalamenti and sung perfectly by the ethereal voiced Julee Cruise; the jazzy dream pop of Floating into the Night is so cinematic that it almost feels like it'd be better fitted for a list of the best 80s movies. And of course that's intended, as most of these songs have been used in Blue Velvet and Twin Peaks. Above all else, it's an experience, and life becomes a nostalgic 80s movie during it.
46: KING SUNNY ADÉ - JUJU MUSIC
Juju Music is such a calm, beautiful and transcendent album. It's really quite simple and has lyrics that I obviously don't understand, but whenever I feel exhausted I can just put this on and feel at peace for a bit. The musicianship is phenomenal in every aspect, with soothing slide guitars, calming, rhythmic talking drums, and King Sunny Adé's gentle voice. It's hard to ever get tired of.
45: TALKING HEADS - REMAIN IN LIGHT
Other than making the second greatest song of the 80s on Speaking in Tongues (you know which one), Remain in Light would be the last spark of greatness from the Talking Heads, and it shows them with loads of confidence, going full force into the new wave / Afrobeat experiments that were hinted at on Fear of Music. It gets weirder as it goes on which, expectedly, means that it peaks directly in the middle with "Once in a Lifetime."
44: PAUL MCCARTNEY - MCCARTNEY II
McCartney II is an album that surprised me, simply because I didn't expect that Paul McCartney would be making good music into the 80s. But not only is this good, it's also very adventurous. It's a spiritual successor to Paul's offbeat debut McCartney, and it's filled with everything from hazy blues rock to ahead-of-their-time experimental electronic instrumentals that sound like Japanese video game music. And it's all upbeat, catchy, and occasionally even life affirming. Though it was dismissed by critics upon its release for being "novelty music" it's now clear the strong influence it's had upon the indie pop of today. Paul's the best Beatle by the way.
43: HÜSKER DÜ - NEW DAY RISING
After the noisy double LP concept album Zen Arcade (which was instrumental in the development of post-hardcore), Hüsker Dü turned towards more melodic power pop that would be a bigger influence on future alternative rock. But here there's just as much energy and better songwriting, and it's still raw as fuck. Is there any love song more perfect and nostalgic than "Books About UFOs"?
42: KATE BUSH - HOUNDS OF LOVE
After the less conventional and commerically unsuccessful The Dreaming Kate Bush came back with her best and most successful album. It opens with Bush's best song, the goosebump-evoking "Running Up That Hill" and it doesn't let up after that, with its cold, epic atmosphere carrying it through memorable experiments in prog pop, ambient pop, and Celtic folk.
41: NURSE WITH WOUND - SOLILOQUY FOR LILITH
Admittedly, I'm not a big drone fan, so for a drone piece to catch me it has to have a stellar atmosphere. And Nurse With Wound's Soliloquy for Lilith succeeds at that better than anything else. The album was intended to be a lot more monotonous than it wound up being; due to malfunctioning equipment, when Stephen Stapleton moved when near the peddles, subtle changes would occur, giving it a feeling of eeriness unlike anything else. Listening to Soliloquy for Lilith is like letting an ominous, futuristic wave of cold air wash over you as you plunge into darkness and let your mind wander. The dark ambient album against which all others should be judged. One note for seventeen minutes never sounded so good (side note: holy shit that album cover is cool).
40: THE BLUE NILE - HATS
Painstakingly perfected over the course of five years, the Blue Nile's Hats is a masterpiece of sophisto-pop. Nothing is wasted, every synth that washes over you and every horn you hear is perfect. Despite every song except one being in the five to seven minute range, there isn't a single song that feels too long; they're all drenched in a cinematic atmosphere that you almost wish would never end. The lyrics are simple yet strongly relatable and evocative and the singing is as passionate and sincere as it gets. Recalls Roxy Music's Avalon, which could never be a bad thing.
39: SWELL MAPS - JANE FROM OCCUPIED EUROPE
Distorted vocals, random bits of free jazz, hectic and claustrophobic guitar work, and rhythmic repetitive drums are the essence of Jane from Occupied Europe. Rather than soothing their post-punk with dub as many bands did, Swell Maps instead looked to musique concrète and krautrock for a chaotic, ear-splitting mess. It sounds like being awake for three days.
38: CELTIC FROST - MORBID TALES
Tom G. Warrior had already pioneered his blend of black metal and thrash metal with his previous band Hellhammer, but with his next band's debut EP he perfected it and created metal's masterpiece. With more thrash and less murkiness than Hellhammer, Morbid Tales packs a punch of insane energy and Tom's deep vocals fit amazingly; and it even reaches the avant-garde. Thankfully nobody can understand shit Tom says, saving it from the corny lyrics typically associated with metal.
37: JOHN ZORN - NAKED CITY
Ever wanted to hear a noise rock version of the Bond theme with random bursts into free jazz - and have it somehow be better than the original? Naked City has you covered. Ever wanted to hear a country song suddenly turn into a grindcore song? Naked City has you covered. Ever wanted to hear vocals from a demon? Naked City has you covered. Jazz still had room to evolve in the 80s, and Naked City had it covered. If you ever wanted your punks to be trained jazz musicians, your days of waiting are over.
36: PINK FLOYD - THE FINAL CUT
Due to the overwhelming control Roger Waters had exerted over this album, he was kicked from the band, but he still managed to send out one last defining statement before Pink Floyd would crumble without him. Originally intended as additional tracks for The Wall, The Final Cut soon became a fully fledged anti-war concept album. It's slow and minimalistic but the lyrics really shine here. For the first time, the entirety of the writing was handled by Waters and he's also the lead singer on every track. He ain't the world's best singer, but this is easily the most passionate Pink Floyd album. Gilmour worshippers aren't ever gonna get it.
35: TELEVISION PERSONALITIES - AND DON'T THE KIDS JUST LOVE IT
And Don't the Kids Just Love It almost sounds like the Television Personalities heard "David Watts" by the Kinks and decided they'd make an entire band based on it... and that's a good thing, because I happen to like that song. Normally, cutesy twee pop isn't my thing, but it's done masterfully here when mixed with energetic post-punk and witty, innocent, relatable, and often hilarious lyrics. An unabashedly British summery gem.
34: NICK CAVE - THE FIRSTBORN IS DEAD
The Firstborn Is Dead sounds like it's being performed by a few outlaws in a rural bar in the south during a thunderstorm. On Cave's second album he makes his first step into the dark, intense punk blues that he'd stick with for a long while. Its crime-heavy atmosphere would be corny if it wasn't so damn convincing - who else could turn simple Bob Dylan and John Lee Hooker songs into some of the most badass songs ever made?
33: THE SMITHS - HATFUL OF HOLLOW
Like many British bands then, the Smiths didn't include their singles on their albums. Their second album, Hatful of Hollow, compiles all of their singles up to that point, all of their B-sides, live versions of the six best songs from the debut (all of which are remarkable improvements over the versions on The Smiths), and five new songs. Great listen all the way through and contains many of their very best songs as well as some of Morrissey's wittiest lyrics.
32: MIDNIGHT OIL - DIESEL AND DUST
Sometimes I find it a bit odd that out of the few 80s Australian bands to achieve massive success in the U.S., Midnight Oil was one of them - an absurdly political band with the most nasally vocalist you're ever gonna hear. Then again, it's also not hard to understand why this was so successful, as every song is delivered with passion and has an A grade melody and thoughtful lyrics. Midnight Oil made many good albums, but Diesel and Dust was their best. It took what they were known for - their politics (both environmental and social) - and gave them some of the catchiest music they'd made. Unless there's someone I'm forgetting, this is the greatest Australian album of all time.
31: FELA KUTI - COFFIN FOR HEAD OF STATE
The title tells you what you're in for. Musically, it's as warm and inviting as Fela has ever been, but lyrically it's by far his most angry. Following his protest album Zombie (which accused the Nigerian military of being mindless zombies) the Nigerian military stormed his commune, destroyed it, murdered his mother, and tortured Fela. Yet Fela was still making protest music, now more in your face than ever. The album is only 22 minutes - two songs, one of which being an instrumental - but it manages to leave a strong impression. It settles into an infectious, funky, jazzy groove, and ends with Fela and his singers yelping a somewhat offensive sarcastic prayer, mocking religion.
30: BRIAN ENO & DAVID BYRNE - MY LIFE IN THE BUSH OF GHOSTS
Less influential than it was innovative, My Life in the Bush of Ghosts is a sample based experimental record, taking a strong influence from Afrobeat and injecting the dancey polyrhythms with hyperactive drumming, Eno's lush soundscapes, and samples of unusual religious chants, political talk radio shows, and an exorcism. It's a warm but eerie experience.
29: DAVID BOWIE - SCARY MONSTERS
On Scary Monsters Bowie brings a new wave edge to the art rock sound of his Berlin trilogy, and with the addition of Robert Fripp on guitar, it turns out fantastic. It often sounds like a more conventional King Crimson album with David Bowie behind the mic, which is as perfect as possible. Fripp's guitar work here is so phenomenal that I wouldn't mind if this was two hours long. Unexpectedly, the best song here is "Up the Hill Backwards," in which Bowie's voice is just one of many in an upbeat sing-along.
28: THE MEKONS - FEAR AND WHISKEY
Funny that this album should wind up just above David Bowie, considering that this band made his favorite song of all time. Ya know, country rock reimagined by an unmistakably British 80s band sounds like an awful idea. But the Mekons made it the unforgettable album that birthed alternative country. A concept album about a community struggling to remain joyful during a war, it still brings plenty of bittersweet relatable lyrics and it's jam-packed with memorable melodies. The passionate "It will be all right!" shout on "Last Dance" may be my favorite moment in all of music. From Wilco to Lucinda Williams to Cowboy Junkies, many great artists owe a debt to Fear and Whiskey.
27: TALK TALK - THE COLOUR OF SPRING
Right before they'd reinvent themselves as a post-rock band, Talk Talk made one last crack at pop music, and they do a swell job. On The Colour of Spring they ditch the new wave sound of their first two albums in favor of an art pop sound, mixing sparse acoustic guitar arrangements with synthesizers, and it's pure beauty all the way through. It has easily the best ending of any album ever, as the eight minute closing track "Time It's Time" shakes free of all the melancholy that preceded it in its final two minutes and gives way to the most gorgeous, uplifting melody I've ever heard, as if winter suddenly turned into spring.
26: NEW ORDER - BROTHERHOOD
Brotherhood is split into two sides: side A is post-punk and side B is new wave. Both offer a lot, but if I had to pick a better side it'd be A, with its Cure-esque upbeat post-punk songs like "Paradise," and "Weirdo." But the best song here is on side B. Bernard Sumner was never a lyrical genius, and while "Bizarre Love Triangle" isn't the most complex song ever, it is a lyrical masterpiece. Most songs are lucky to have one great line, but in "Bizarre Love Triangle" every line makes you feel something. And that's not even mentioning the music, which has enough separate melodies to have made several phenomenal songs. There's nothing that gives me an eargasm like that lead in to the chorus or that bass solo at the end. "Bizarre Love Triangle" is the best song of the 80s.
25: BOB MARLEY - UPRISING
Bob Marley's final album was recorded when he had already accepted that he was about to die from cancer, and he gives it his all here. The songs here all show both a sense of poignancy and optimism, as he writes songs about mutually assured destruction, rebellion, and drug addicts turning to prostitution. But perhaps the best thing about Uprising is that Marley was able to close his career (and life) on the timeless, uplifting "Redemption Song." Lucky that he managed to finish things up with what may very well be his very best album and his very best song.
24: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN - NEBRASKA
If there are three all time great storytellers in music, then Bruce Springsteen is one of them (I suppose Bob Dylan and Tom Waits are the other two). And his storytelling is never better than on Nebraska, an album that reaches a level of hauntedness that any (insert "dark" genre) band could only wish to achieve. On Nebraska Springsteen strips away all the stadium ready polish of his most well known work in favor of a simple, sparse sound: just him, an acoustic guitar, and a harmonica. All the songs are about working class people and most tell tales of crime in the most humanly manner possible. When Bruce sings "Well I'm tired of comin' out on the losin' end / So honey last night I met this guy and I'm gonna do a little favor for him" on "Atlantic City" you truly feel for this man unlike any other crime related song. Every song is delivered with a sense of empathy in a way that makes it so you can't help but feel for these people. There's the intense "State Trooper" that ends with the startling screams, there's the hopeless optimism of "Mansion on the Hill" and "Reason to Believe," there's the questionable morality of "Highway Patrolman," and then there's the title track, where Bruce even makes you empathize with a serial killer.
23: BLONDIE - AUTOAMERICAN
On Blondie's first album of the 80s they did things a little differently and simply threw everything at the wall to see what would stick, and it all does. They were no longer just a new wave band; here there's jazz pop, disco rap, pop reggae, and even modern classical. It's all a little dorky, but in a charming way. The goofy rapping on "Rapture" is oddly endearing (and man, that bassline), and the many dancey songs are insanely catchy. Dumb pop music doesn't get any better.
22: MEAT PUPPETS - UP ON THE SUN
It stuns me that Up on the Sun came out in 1985, as it sounds like half the popular indie bands of the 90s. For their third album the Meat Puppets totally ditched the punkishness of their early work and instead brought a peaceful, lethargic sound with surreal lyrics of pure fantasy and relatable summery tales of youth, some funky basslines, and the most perfectly fit vocalist in the world. It's gentle, but in a really fucking cool way. There is nothing like it.
21: ROXY MUSIC - AVALON
I can still vividly remember GTA: Vice City. Games have obviously since progressed far beyond what they were in 2002 but no game has yet managed to immerse me in the way Vice City did. And that statement isn't just nostalgia speaking, this game still sucks me in today. A massive part of what made this game so great was the music, because while not all of it was great (in fact, some of it was extraordinarily awful), it all felt so of the time and place that no matter how few pixels there were, you couldn't help but feel like you were there. Roxy Music had two songs on the Vice City airways, both of which are from this album. I can still remember the first time I got out of my pimpin' apartment at night and hopped in the Dodge Dart that was always parked by the stairs and flipped the radio to "EMOTION 98.3" as the song "More Than This" faded in. I had chills as I drove down the GTA equivalent of South Beach, past the pixelated prostitutes and palm trees and illuminated neon buildings. I was so awestruck by the game's and the song's beauty that I wasn't even tempted to run over the pedestrians that were just begging to be flattened. Never before had I felt like I was somewhere else so much. I didn't save the game so that every time I booted it up I could experience the same thing with the same song (don't worry, I eventually beat it). And every time I didn't feel like I was playing a game, but instead felt like I was there, in 1986 Miami. The melody is so perfectly subtle, the kind you could never get sick of, while also being infectious. The chorus is almost anticlimactic in the best way possible. As Bryan Ferry sings "There's nothing more than this" I can't help but agree. If he's talking about love, I'm with him. If he's talking about the fact that those are the only words in the chorus, then yeah, I suppose he's right about that too. The feeling "More Than This" holds is one that carries through the rest of the album. It may not be as arty as their 70s work, but for their last album Bryan Ferry finally dropped his trademark sarcasm and gave way to sincerity here, and it's beautiful. From beginning to end, Avalon is the feeling of romance.
20: THE FALL - HEX ENDUCTION HOUR
The Fall have a fucking massive discography, pumping out album after album, year after year, so it's a bit of a shock that they still managed a few front to back classics. Hex Enduction Hour is the Fall at their rawest, most experimental, and most furious. Initially intended to be their last album, they gave it their all, bringing in a second drummer for a thunderous rhythm section and giving us sixty minutes of music. It's here that Mark E. Smith gets the closest he ever did to his krautrock idols Can on songs like "Iceland;" and slow songs like "Hip Priest" and "Winter" that would've been boring from anybody else are made invigorating with Smith's shouts and cryptic lyrics and the band's sudden explosions into noise rock. Of course I'm glad they continued, but this would've been a hell of a closer.
19: THE POGUES - IF I SHOULD FALL FROM GRACE WITH GOD
"The Turkish Song of the Damned" has the funniest story I've ever heard behind a song, so I'll let Shane tell you it: "'The Turkish Song of the Damned' was a Kraut trying to tell me something and I misheard him. He said 'Have you heard 'The Turkish Song' by The Damned'." Rum Sodomy and the Lash may be the more famous album, but this is the (slightly) better one, even if it took me some time to realize that. The hedonism and energy are greatly lowered, but MacGowan's lyrics are somehow even better here, dealing with more mature themes. It's also more eclectic. Ever wanted to hear a Celtic rock version of big band or Spanish music? You get that here. It certainly wears its heart on its sleeves, but that just makes for some of the best songs ever written. How can the title track or "Fairytale of New York" or "The Broad Majestic Shannon" not make you feel something?
18: XTC - ENGLISH SETTLEMENT
XTC makes their first dip into their arty future on English Settlement, a pleasant mix of new wave and art rock, with a few Afrobeat and juju experiments and many time signatures that aren't common in the world of pop music. It's both their longest and most consistent album, and it provides a plethora of catchy songs that dive into a politics deeper than XTC ever have. "Knuckle Down" may be the most delightfully silly anti-racism song ever made, and it's equally catchy.
17: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN - TUNNEL OF LOVE
While Nebraska has his best storytelling, Tunnel of Love has his best songwriting. Born in the U.S.A. often felt cheesy due to its overblown 80s production, and while that's still the case here, the synths are now more understated and better served by this album's softness and introspection. It may still be cheesy, but Bruce brings wonderful melodies and his best lyrics (mostly concerning his failing marriage). The A side is good, but this is likely the most back-loaded album of all time. The last six songs are the best, and they're all honest, resonant, and a bit depressing. The best song, "Brilliant Disguise" comes towards the end, beginning as an accusation towards his partner and - by only changing one word in the chorus - ending as a question of his own shortcomings.
16: THE DURUTTI COLUMN - VINI REILLY
Though undoubtedly influential on post-rock, the oft praised early work of the Durutti Column is a bit too passive for me. Though almost entirely instrumental, Vini Reilly still manages to evoke strong feelings of both melancholy and overwhelming joy. It's got everything from dream pop to new age to funk covered and it makes incredibly innovative use of sampling, obscuring the voices of soulful singers in a way that adds a deeper layer to the emotional atmosphere. The production is incredible; everything is aligned to perfectly bring out the most emotion. A one second sample can bring you to chills.
15: JOY DIVISION - SUBSTANCE
Substance is a compilation, but it's not a "best of" compilation. Joy Division were a band that didn't include their singles on their albums, and Substance compiles all of their singles along with a few B-sides and EP tracks to make for ten killer songs, ordered (mostly) chronologically that show how quickly this band evolved from 1978 to 1980, starting with punk rock and ending with synth-pop. As a depressed teenager, nothing got to me like this album. Curtis's vocals weren't perfect, but they oozed sincerity, and to me that made them imperfectly perfect. I think most everyone knows "Atmosphere" and "Love Will Tear Us Apart" but the other eight songs here are nearly as good.
14: PUBLIC IMAGE LTD. - THE FLOWERS OF ROMANCE
It's been called the most inaccessible album to ever be released on a major label, and that's hard to disagree with. After the departure of bassist Jah Wobble, whose reggae rhythms were essential to the band's sound; and without a steady drummer, John Lydon and Keith Levene took PiL into their own hands. Rather than replace their bassist, they just said "no bass" (there's only bass on a couple songs). Even the guitar is used much, much differently here, disregarding melody even more than on Metal Box and instead used for atmosphere. Most of the focus instead went into boomy, repetitive drumbeats that entirely constitute the melodies, Lydon's vocals that sound like a senile British grandma, and his experimentation with middle eastern instruments and musique concrète soundscapes using tapes. And while the drumming may not be all that complex, every single beat sticks in your head. There still isn't anything like this.
13: GANG OF FOUR - SOLID GOLD
In spite of fully embracing the art punk undertones from Entertainment! on Solid Gold, Gang of Four still went from "underground post-punk" to charting in the top 30 on the U.S. club singles chart. But no matter how funky or rhythmic this music is, it's still a shock how popular it wound being - it's as menacing as music comes. This time around, Andy Gill's guitar work is less focused on melody and more off doing its own thing with an abrasive metallic sound that makes you feel like you're getting stabbed in the ears (in a good way). It's like a tighter, more structured, and dancier version of PiL's Metal Box. Their lyrics are also better here, exploring their Marxist themes in a more personal and effective fashion. Art punk's masterpiece.
12: THE CLASH - COMBAT ROCK
Following the triple LP worldly excess of Sandinista! Mick Jones wanted to do it again. Joe Strummer panned his vision, half the songs were removed, and we wound up with Combat Rock. The decision lead to their breaking up, but as far as a last hurrahs go, Combat Rock succeeds, even if it's a little bittersweet and weaker than their previous work. It may be their most popular album, but it's also secretly their artiest. The album's A-side is filled with hits - I think everyone's heard "Rock the Casbah" and "Should I Stay or Should I Go," and you're sure to recognize "Straight to Hell" - but the B-side is where the best stuff is found, and is evidence of what Jones originally wanted to do; there's a few Exotica, funk, and hip hop experiments. Oddly calm for a Clash album but beautiful nevertheless.
11: TOM WAITS - SWORDFISHTROMBONES
Tom Waits' blues oriented music prior to Swordfishtrombones is... different to say the least. Apparently the story goes that once he met his wife, she introduced him to more avant-garde music such as Beefheart, and he loved it so much that he changed his sound overnight from conventional blues to whatever this is. Swordfishtrombones isn't his best album as that was still yet to come, but it his most important. Everything you could want is here, from hilarious dark jazz beat poetry like "Frank's Wild Years," to noir-ish experimental rockers with surreal storytelling like the title track, to sincere love songs like "Johnsburg, Illinois;" as well as many awesome jazz instrumentals.
10: THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS - LINCOLN
I'm not exaggerating when I say that no album has better writing than Lincoln. The melodies! How do they come up with so many of them?! The lyrics! There's so many that will make you laugh, and so many that'll rip your heart out (sometimes even in the same song). And there's all those experiments that manage to both seem unusual and fit in perfectly on a pop album. And those nasally vocals that perfectly convey everything they intend to? Lincoln is a goofy but earnest album, and there'll never be another like it, not even from the men who made it. But why should anyone expect there to be?
9: ANTENA - CAMINO DEL SOL
Joy Division / New Order and the Durutti Column may be the most well known bands from Factory Records, but the mostly female French band Antena was nearly as good. Their only album, Camino del sol, is an eighteen minute record that mixes lounge music and synth-pop with bossa nova to make for an entrancing dreamy atmosphere, and it's so irresistibly soft. Sometimes it blows my mind that this came out in 1982, it would fit in perfectly with modern indie pop. It simultaneously sounds like it's from the 60s, the 80s, 2013, and 2500. It sounds like the future, just not our future.
8: THE POLICE - GHOST IN THE MACHINE
The moment that cold, synth driven reggae beat comes in on the opener "Spirits in the Material World," it's clear that the Police have changed. The Police embracing 80s production could have ended poorly but they use it for a sleek, atmospheric sound that suits the album very well. Unlike the other Police albums, Ghost in the Machine is dark, cold, and far more political and affecting than the Police had ever been, even if it is more pop oriented than the band's first three albums. Stewart Copeland's drumming on this album is also some of the best I've ever heard, it isn't particularly flashy but he's always doing something interesting.
7: KING CRIMSON - DISCIPLINE
King Crimson were originally going to call it quits after Red. After all, it was their best album up to that point and would've made for the band's perfect ending (just listen to "Starless" and tell me those last thirty seconds aren't the perfect send-off). The only reason for them to come back would be if they could top Red - and that they did. Adrian Belew (Talking Heads) replaced John Wetton and became the group's frontman, singer, and main songwriter. On Discipline they adapted with the times, dropping the jazz and classical influences of their 70s work for new wave. Rather than being cold and distant like on their early work, they became warm and, at times, even inviting. Belew's lyrics are dorky but memorable and endearing - "Matte Kudasai" may be the prettiest song I've ever heard, and Belew's voice on it is incredible. The two closing instrumentals are also beautiful and quite groovy in spite of their insanely complicated time signatures (they would be a massive influence on all future math rock).
6: JOY DIVISION - CLOSER
It seems odd that Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook, and Stephen Morris didn't know this would be their last album as Joy Division when they chose the name "Closer" and put a grave on the cover. Just before its release, on the day before their first U.S. tour, Ian Curtis would hang himself while listening to Iggy Pop's The Idiot. And throughout Closer, it's clear how depressed Curtis was - never has there been more emotionally intense music. By comparison, Unknown Pleasures seems cheery. And it makes sense too, seeing as his life had gone through massive changes in just the past year: he had had an affair, his epilepsy had worsened, and he was about to go on a world tour when he was already uncomfortable performing as often as he did. At times, it feels like Curtis is writing his own epitaph, especially on "Twenty Four Hours": "Gotta find my destiny before it gets too late."
5: NEW ORDER - POWER, CORRUPTION AND LIES
Following the suicide of Ian Curtis, Joy Division still had a lot of phenomenal music left in them; they were just going to have to make it without him. And that they did. Rather than looking outside of the band for a new singer, guitarist Bernard Sumner apprehensively took over as the band's new singer and main songwriter. And he can't sing for shit, but his voice is quite nice and he's probably written half the great melodies in existence. After being Joy Division 2.0 on Movement (and doing a good job of it) New Order very quickly found their own identity on Power, Corruption and Lies, and you can tell the instant that the bass line on "Age of Consent" begins: it's almost happy. And is there anything as beautiful as that synth drenched bridge? Sumner's lyrics throughout are simple yet poetic and charming, the music is atmospheric and absurdly catchy, and it has several of the band's greatest songs. There's the joyous "The Village," the cold and mechanical "5-8-6," the epic "Your Silent Face," the melancholic closer "Leave Me Alone," and the top selling twelve inch single of all time, "Blue Monday" (which actually lost an insane amount of money due to its expensive packaging). Overall, this album is the band's peak and the one I enjoy revisiting the most.
4: TALK TALK - SPIRIT OF EDEN
It's pretty common for bands to become more popular and mainstream as they go on, but the other way around? Not as much. After three pop albums (one of which, The Colour of Spring, went 2x platinum) and a top 40 single, Talk Talk took a direction that was barely hinted at on The Colour of Spring. Completely convinced (for some strange reason) that his new idea would sell four million copies (spoiler alert: it sold an eighth of that), Mark Hollis and co. improvised for hours upon hours a day in a dark room for over a year, and when they were done they did some very extensive editing and chopped it all down to just forty minutes. This meditative piece of jazzy chamber music was not what the label had expected would come out of that studio. It was a totally unmarketable direction, and as a result Talk Talk was dropped from their label. It sounds as if mother nature decided to make an album. It's everything; peaceful, melancholic, uplifting, even a little angry. The best song here is "I Believe in You," a song about Mark Hollis's brother dying of a heroin overdose. Even if the same thing hadn't happened to my brother, this song's beauty would still give me chills every time I hear it. When that small choir comes in on the chorus, it moves me like nothing else.
3: TOM WAITS - RAIN DOGS
Swordfishtrombones was a good first step, but Rain Dogs is Tom Waits' masterpiece. Here he combines everything he'd done up to this point and adds more; here we have experimental rock, jazz, country, folk, and blues rock. It may not be as weird as Swordfishtrombones but it benefits from its more conventional songs. It seems that plenty of experimental music only aims stimulate you intellectually and totally forgets emotion, but Tom doesn't do that. "Hang Down Your Head," "Time," and "Downtown Train" are the three best and most emotional songs Tom ever made. It's an unusual world Tom's built with this album; involving lots of crime, carnivals, Cuban jails, gun street girls, and women with tattooed tears ("One for each year he's away"); but it's also a world that's full of hope and love.
2: THE POLICE - SYNCHRONICITY
At the time, they were the biggest band in the world. Some said Ghost in the Machine was a sellout album, and while Synchronicity is calmer and nearly as pop oriented, it'd be a mistake to think it's any worse than their early work - there is more substance here than on anything else they've done, with some of their densest, artiest music and Sting's most poetic and political lyrics. No matter how overplayed it is, "Every Breath You Take" will always be one of the all time great songs. The fact that so many people think it's a love song proves how well it achieves what it set out to, by being incredibly creepy while being barely creepy at all. The lyrics are so perfectly simple, the melody is one of the best ever, and it has a hairraising bridge and outro. "King of Pain" is another highlight, a brilliant passionate ballad with an ending that always moves me. And then there's the experimental rock track "Mother," one of the most hated songs ever, but that's likely only the case because of how strange it seemed to the humorless pop consumers. 'Tis is a jolly good tune.
1: THE CLASH - SANDINISTA!
I think we all have trouble putting the emotions our favorite pieces of art make us feel into words, so I'll try my best. Sandinista! is an album I never expected to love this much. First of all, it's a triple album - sold for the price of one, which required that CBS take a massive cut from the band, and the Clash gladly accepted - and it's two hours and 24 minutes long. If you're going to put 36 songs on an album, it's gonna need to be incredibly consistent if it wants to hold one's attention. Fortunately, Sandinista! has more perfect, hairraising songs than any other album ever. I think what puts the Clash ahead of almost all (or all) of the punk bands to emerge in the mid to late 70s is their ability to evolve. They never did the same thing twice; they'd immediately perfect something and then move on to something else. To me, Sandinista! is their album that exemplifies this ability the best. This album is two and a half hours of worldly weirdness with everything from post-punk to reggae to rockabilly to jazz to boogie woogie to calypso to rapping to disco to funk rock to folk to experimental rock to Celtic punk to children's choirs, and even some of their punk rock roots remain; and it covers everything from the draft to the Cuban Revolution to the Nicaraguan Sandinistas to simple breakups. It helps that everything here is done well (well, maybe the children's choirs didn't need to be there). It is the most passionate album you will ever hear, but in a surprisingly different way than London Calling. For one thing, Joe Strummer has vastly improved as a lyricist here. Compare "Death or Glory" to "Washington Bullets." The former is Joe's idealistic fantasies, the latter is an informative critique of the first world's interference in the goings of the developing world. Sandinista! is the culmination of months of recording in New York, in which every song they made turned out so damn good they had to release it all. Their approach to its making was quite loose; Joe Strummer had a bed in the back of the studio and he'd lay there reading while listening to music from all around the world, and whenever he felt an inspiration he'd simply get up and lay out his ideas. While many multiple LP albums try to be over the top epics, Sandinista! simply sets out to be a fun time with a purpose. Joe once said "After a while when journalists would ask us, 'Are you musicians or are you politicians?' I thought I'd watch us for 24 hours to get the answer. And I watched us and we only talked about music." And it makes sense. Just listen to "Corner Soul," one of the album's best songs; it's about many things, one of them being how music can be the most valuable thing there is, regardless of where you are. A bit cheesy, but it sums up Joe's messages quite well. If there were only one album I could listen to for the rest of my life, I'd pick this one in a heartbeat. Excess and consistency will never again go hand in hand the way they do on Sandinista! What're your favorite 80s albums?
submitted by DungeonessSpit to 80smusic [link] [comments]


2019.10.18 10:13 MBTItypemeyo Top 50

50: MINUTEMEN - WHAT MAKES A MAN START FIRES?
I wrote another one of these that had some problems, so I decided to correct it. Narrowing this down to just fifty albums was excruciating for me. There is so, so much great music from the 80s that I wanted to make a top hundred (or more) but alas, that is too many characters for one Reddit post. As a result, every album here is one I love dearly. So without further ado, I'll get into it. To me, the 80s were the last decade to feature massive amounts of innovation. Sure new genres appeared in the 90s, but nothing as significant as electronic music turning into pop or hip hop entering the mainstream. And while the Minutemen are absolutely popular among music fans, they're overlooked when it comes to their originality. Some fools would assume that longer songs tend to be more complex and better, but the Minutemen say fuck that and add complexity by coming up with phenomenal melodies, only using them for a minute and a half while still fully developing the song, and then storming into the next energetic burst of a song. Most are going to point you to the nearly as good Double Nickels on the Dime but What Makes a Man Start Fires? is where they do what they do best... the best.
49: PIXIES - COME ON PILGRIM
To me, alternative rock has always represented a certain type of blandness, and the Pixies are often considered to be among the pioneers of modern "alternative" rock (their quiet / loud dynamic would be quite popular among grunge bands). However, I've always felt that there's something that separates the Pixies from their countless imitators. Could be their occasional bursts into noise rock, or maybe Black's unique voice and outlandish lyrics involving sci-fi and lots of incest. Anyway, I like my Pixies raw, noisy, and energetic; and they never elucidate these qualities more than on their debut EP Come on Pilgrim, composed of demos recorded in 1987. But for demos, these are all crisp and fully developed songs, especially the instantly catchy "The Holiday Song," and the folkish "Nimrod's Son."
48: GLENN BRANCA - THE ASCENSION
The Ascension is a no wave album by modern classical composer Glenn Branca... and it sounds like what you'd expect: an intense symphony of angry distorted guitars. With it being a rock album that completely ignores traditional rock structures, it would certainly be an influence on future post-rock and it uniquely explored the possibilities that several guitars present in a way that hadn't been done.
47: JULEE CRUISE - FLOATING INTO THE NIGHT
Written by David Lynch and Angelo Badalamenti and sung perfectly by the ethereal voiced Julee Cruise; the jazzy dream pop of Floating into the Night is so cinematic that it almost feels like it'd be better fitted for a list of the best 80s movies. And of course that's intended, as most of these songs have been used in Blue Velvet and Twin Peaks. Above all else, it's an experience, and life becomes a nostalgic 80s movie during it.
46: KING SUNNY ADÉ - JUJU MUSIC
Juju Music is such a calm, beautiful and transcendent album. It's really quite simple and has lyrics that I obviously don't understand, but whenever I feel exhausted I can just put this on and feel at peace for a bit. The musicianship is phenomenal in every aspect, with soothing slide guitars, calming, rhythmic talking drums, and King Sunny Adé's gentle voice. It's hard to ever get tired of.
45: TALKING HEADS - REMAIN IN LIGHT
Other than making the second greatest song of the 80s on Speaking in Tongues (you know which one), Remain in Light would be the last spark of greatness from the Talking Heads, and it shows them with loads of confidence, going full force into the new wave / Afrobeat experiments that were hinted at on Fear of Music. It gets weirder as it goes on which, expectedly, means that it peaks directly in the middle with "Once in a Lifetime."
44: PAUL MCCARTNEY - MCCARTNEY II
McCartney II is an album that surprised me, simply because I didn't expect that Paul McCartney would be making good music into the 80s. But not only is this good, it's also very adventurous. It's a spiritual successor to Paul's offbeat debut McCartney, and it's filled with everything from hazy blues rock to ahead-of-their-time experimental electronic instrumentals that sound like Japanese video game music. And it's all upbeat, catchy, and occasionally even life affirming. Though it was dismissed by critics upon its release for being "novelty music" it's now clear the strong influence it's had upon the indie pop of today. Paul's the best Beatle by the way.
43: HÜSKER DÜ - NEW DAY RISING
After the noisy double LP concept album Zen Arcade (which was instrumental in the development of post-hardcore), Hüsker Dü turned towards more melodic power pop that would be a bigger influence on future alternative rock. But here there's just as much energy and better songwriting, and it's still raw as fuck. Is there any love song more perfect and nostalgic than "Books About UFOs"?
42: KATE BUSH - HOUNDS OF LOVE
After the less conventional and commerically unsuccessful The Dreaming Kate Bush came back with her best and most successful album. It opens with Bush's best song, the goosebump-evoking "Running Up That Hill" and it doesn't let up after that, with its cold, epic atmosphere carrying it through memorable experiments in prog pop, ambient pop, and Celtic folk.
41: NURSE WITH WOUND - SOLILOQUY FOR LILITH
Admittedly, I'm not a big drone fan, so for a drone piece to catch me it has to have a stellar atmosphere. And Nurse With Wound's Soliloquy for Lilith succeeds at that better than anything else. The album was intended to be a lot more monotonous than it wound up being; due to malfunctioning equipment, when Stephen Stapleton moved when near the peddles, subtle changes would occur, giving it a feeling of eeriness unlike anything else. Listening to Soliloquy for Lilith is like letting an ominous, futuristic wave of cold air wash over you as you plunge into darkness and let your mind wander. The dark ambient album against which all others should be judged. One note for seventeen minutes never sounded so good (side note: holy shit that album cover is cool).
40: THE BLUE NILE - HATS
Painstakingly perfected over the course of five years, the Blue Nile's Hats is a masterpiece of sophisto-pop. Nothing is wasted, every synth that washes over you and every horn you hear is perfect. Despite every song except one being in the five to seven minute range, there isn't a single song that feels too long; they're all drenched in a cinematic atmosphere that you almost wish would never end. The lyrics are simple yet strongly relatable and evocative and the singing is as passionate and sincere as it gets. Recalls Roxy Music's Avalon, which could never be a bad thing.
39: SWELL MAPS - JANE FROM OCCUPIED EUROPE
Distorted vocals, random bits of free jazz, hectic and claustrophobic guitar work, and rhythmic repetitive drums are the essence of Jane from Occupied Europe. Rather than soothing their post-punk with dub as many bands did, Swell Maps instead looked to musique concrète and krautrock for a chaotic, ear-splitting mess. It sounds like being awake for three days.
38: CELTIC FROST - MORBID TALES
Tom G. Warrior had already pioneered his blend of black metal and thrash metal with his previous band Hellhammer, but with his next band's debut EP he perfected it and created metal's masterpiece. With more thrash and less murkiness than Hellhammer, Morbid Tales packs a punch of insane energy and Tom's deep vocals fit amazingly; and it even reaches the avant-garde. Thankfully nobody can understand shit Tom says, saving it from the corny lyrics typically associated with metal.
37: JOHN ZORN - NAKED CITY
Ever wanted to hear a noise rock version of the Bond theme with random bursts into free jazz - and have it somehow be better than the original? Naked City has you covered. Ever wanted to hear a country song suddenly turn into a grindcore song? Naked City" has you covered. Ever wanted to hear vocals from a demon? *Naked City has you covered. Jazz still had room to evolve in the 80s, and Naked City had it covered. If you ever wanted your punks to be trained jazz musicians, your days of waiting are over.
36: PINK FLOYD - THE FINAL CUT
Due to the overwhelming control Roger Waters had exerted over this album, he was kicked from the band, but he still managed to send out one last defining statement before Pink Floyd would crumble without him. Originally intended as additional tracks for The Wall, The Final Cut soon became a fully fledged anti-war concept album. It's slow and minimalistic but the lyrics really shine here. For the first time, the entirety of the writing was handled by Waters and he's also the lead singer on every track. He ain't the world's best singer, but this is easily the most passionate Pink Floyd album. Gilmour worshippers aren't ever gonna get it.
35: TELEVISION PERSONALITIES - AND DON'T THE KIDS JUST LOVE IT
And Don't the Kids Just Love It almost sounds like the Television Personalities heard "David Watts" by the Kinks and decided they'd make an entire band based on it... and that's a good thing, because I happen to like that song. Normally, cutesy twee pop isn't my thing, but it's done masterfully here when mixed with energetic post-punk and witty, innocent, relatable, and often hilarious lyrics. An unabashedly British summery gem.
34: NICK CAVE - THE FIRSTBORN IS DEAD
The Firstborn Is Dead sounds like it's being performed by a few outlaws in a rural bar in the south during a thunderstorm. On Cave's second album he makes his first step into the dark, intense punk blues that he'd stick with for a long while. Its crime-heavy atmosphere would be corny if it wasn't so damn convincing - who else could turn simple Bob Dylan and John Lee Hooker songs into some of the most badass songs ever made?
33: THE SMITHS - HATFUL OF HOLLOW
Like many British bands then, the Smiths didn't include their singles on their albums. Their second album, Hatful of Hollow, compiles all of their singles up to that point, all of their B-sides, live versions of the six best songs from the debut (all of which are remarkable improvements over the versions on The Smiths), and five new songs. Great listen all the way through and contains many of their very best songs as well as some of Morrissey's wittiest lyrics.
32: MIDNIGHT OIL - DIESEL AND DUST
Sometimes I find it a bit odd that out of the few 80s Australian bands to achieve massive success in the U.S., Midnight Oil was one of them - an absurdly political band with the most nasally vocalist you're ever gonna hear. Then again, it's also not hard to understand why this was so successful, as every song is delivered with passion and has an A grade melody and thoughtful lyrics. Midnight Oil made many good albums, but Diesel and Dust was their best. It took what they were known for - their politics (both environmental and social) - and gave them some of the catchiest music they'd made. Unless there's someone I'm forgetting, this is the greatest Australian album of all time.
31: FELA KUTI - COFFIN FOR HEAD OF STATE
The title tells you what you're in for. Musically, it's as warm and inviting as Fela has ever been, but lyrically it's by far his most angry. Following his protest album Zombie (which accused the Nigerian military of being mindless zombies) the Nigerian military stormed his commune, destroyed it, murdered his mother, and tortured Fela. Yet Fela was still making protest music, now more in your face than ever. The album is only 22 minutes - two songs, one of which being an instrumental - but it manages to leave a strong impression. It settles into an infectious, funky, jazzy groove, and ends with Fela and his singers yelping a somewhat offensive sarcastic prayer, mocking religion.
30: BRIAN ENO & DAVID BYRNE - MY LIFE IN THE BUSH OF GHOSTS
Less influential than it was innovative, My Life in the Bush of Ghosts is a sample based experimental record, taking a strong influence from Afrobeat and injecting the dancey polyrhythms with hyperactive drumming, Eno's lush soundscapes, and samples of unusual religious chants, political talk radio shows, and an exorcism. It's a warm but eerie experience.
29: DAVID BOWIE - SCARY MONSTERS
On Scary Monsters Bowie brings a new wave edge to the art rock sound of his Berlin trilogy, and with the addition of Robert Fripp on guitar, it turns out fantastic. It often sounds like a more conventional King Crimson album with David Bowie behind the mic, which is as perfect as possible. Fripp's guitar work here is so phenomenal that I wouldn't mind if this was two hours long. Unexpectedly, the best song here is "Up the Hill Backwards," in which Bowie's voice is just one of many in an upbeat sing-along.
28: THE MEKONS - FEAR AND WHISKEY
Funny that this album should wind up just above David Bowie, considering that this band made his favorite song of all time. Ya know, country rock reimagined by an unmistakably British 80s band sounds like an awful idea. But the Mekons made it the unforgettable album that birthed alternative country. A concept album about a community struggling to remain joyful during a war, it still brings plenty of bittersweet relatable lyrics and it's jam-packed with memorable melodies. The passionate "It will be all right!" shout on "Last Dance" may be my favorite moment in all of music. From Wilco to Lucinda Williams to Cowboy Junkies, many great artists owe a debt to Fear and Whiskey.
27: TALK TALK - THE COLOUR OF SPRING
Right before they'd reinvent themselves as a post-rock band, Talk Talk made one last crack at pop music, and they do a swell job. On The Colour of Spring they ditch the new wave sound of their first two albums in favor of an art pop sound, mixing sparse acoustic guitar arrangements with synthesizers, and it's pure beauty all the way through. It has easily the best ending of any album ever, as the eight minute closing track "Time It's Time" shakes free of all the melancholy that preceded it in its final two minutes and gives way to the most gorgeous, uplifting melody I've ever heard, as if winter suddenly turned into spring.
26: NEW ORDER - BROTHERHOOD
Brotherhood is split into two sides: side A is post-punk and side B is new wave. Both offer a lot, but if I had to pick a better side it'd be A, with its Cure-esque upbeat post-punk songs like "Paradise," and "Weirdo." But the best song here is on side B. Bernard Sumner was never a lyrical genius, and while "Bizarre Love Triangle" isn't the most complex song ever, it is a lyrical masterpiece. Most songs are lucky to have one great line, but in "Bizarre Love Triangle" every line makes you feel something. And that's not even mentioning the music, which has enough separate melodies to have made several phenomenal songs. There's nothing that gives me an eargasm like that lead in to the chorus or that bass solo at the end. "Bizarre Love Triangle" is the best song of the 80s.
25: BOB MARLEY - UPRISING
Bob Marley's final album was recorded when he had already accepted that he was about to die from cancer, and he gives it his all here. The songs here all show both a sense of poignancy and optimism, as he writes songs about mutually assured destruction, rebellion, and drug addicts turning to prostitution. But perhaps the best thing about Uprising is that Marley was able to close his career (and life) on the timeless, uplifting "Redemption Song." Lucky that he managed to finish things up with what may very well be his very best album and his very best song.
24: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN - NEBRASKA
If there are three all time great storytellers in music, then Bruce Springsteen is one of them (I suppose Bob Dylan and Tom Waits are the other two). And his storytelling is never better than on Nebraska, an album that reaches a level of hauntedness that any (insert "dark" genre) band could only wish to achieve. On Nebraska Springsteen strips away all the stadium ready polish of his most well known work in favor of a simple, sparse sound: just him, an acoustic guitar, and a harmonica. All the songs are about working class people and most tell tales of crime in the most humanly manner possible. When Bruce sings "Well I'm tired of comin' out on the losin' end / So honey last night I met this guy and I'm gonna do a little favor for him" on "Atlantic City" you truly feel for this man unlike any other crime related song. Every song is delivered with a sense of empathy in a way that makes it so you can't help but feel for these people. There's the intense "State Trooper" that ends with the startling screams, there's the hopeless optimism of "Mansion on the Hill" and "Reason to Believe," there's the questionable morality of "Highway Patrolman," and then there's the title track, where Bruce even makes you empathize with a serial killer.
23: BLONDIE - AUTOAMERICAN
On Blondie's first album of the 80s they did things a little differently and simply threw everything at the wall to see what would stick, and it all does. They were no longer just a new wave band; here there's jazz pop, disco rap, pop reggae, and even modern classical. It's all a little dorky, but in a charming way. The goofy rapping on "Rapture" is oddly endearing (and man, that bassline), and the many dancey songs are insanely catchy. Dumb pop music doesn't get any better.
22: MEAT PUPPETS - UP ON THE SUN
It stuns me that Up on the Sun came out in 1985, as it sounds like half the popular indie bands of the 90s. For their third album the Meat Puppets totally ditched the punkishness of their early work and instead brought a peaceful, lethargic sound with surreal lyrics of pure fantasy and relatable summery tales of youth, some funky basslines, and the most perfectly fit vocalist in the world. It's gentle, but in a really fucking cool way. There is nothing like it.
21: ROXY MUSIC - AVALON
I can still vividly remember GTA: Vice City. Games have obviously since progressed far beyond what they were in 2002 but no game has yet managed to immerse me in the way Vice City did. And that statement isn't just nostalgia speaking, this game still sucks me in today. A massive part of what made this game so great was the music, because while not all of it was great (in fact, some of it was extraordinarily awful), it all felt so of the time and place that no matter how few pixels there were, you couldn't help but feel like you were there. Roxy Music had two songs on the Vice City airways, both of which are from this album. I can still remember the first time I got out of my pimpin' apartment at night and hopped in the Dodge Dart that was always parked by the stairs and flipped the radio to "EMOTION 98.3" as the song "More Than This" faded in. I had chills as I drove down the GTA equivalent of South Beach, past the pixelated prostitutes and palm trees and illuminated neon buildings. I was so awestruck by the game's and the song's beauty that I wasn't even tempted to run over the pedestrians that were just begging to be flattened. Never before had I felt like I was somewhere else so much. I didn't save the game so that every time I booted it up I could experience the same thing with the same song (don't worry, I eventually beat it). And every time I didn't feel like I was playing a game, but instead felt like I was there, in 1986 Miami. The melody is so perfectly subtle, the kind you could never get sick of, while also being infectious. The chorus is almost anticlimactic in the best way possible. As Bryan Ferry sings "There's nothing more than this" I can't help but agree. If he's talking about love, I'm with him. If he's talking about the fact that those are the only words in the chorus, then yeah, I suppose he's right about that too. The feeling "More Than This" holds is one that carries through the rest of the album. It may not be as arty as their 70s work, but for their last album Bryan Ferry finally dropped his trademark sarcasm and gave way to sincerity here, and it's beautiful. From beginning to end, Avalon is the feeling of romance.
20: THE FALL - HEX ENDUCTION HOUR
The Fall have a fucking massive discography, pumping out album after album, year after year, so it's a bit of a shock that they still managed a few front to back classics. Hex Enduction Hour is the Fall at their rawest, most experimental, and most furious. Initially intended to be their last album, they gave it their all, bringing in a second drummer for a thunderous rhythm section and giving us sixty minutes of music. It's here that Mark E. Smith gets the closest he ever did to his krautrock idols Can on songs like "Iceland;" and slow songs like "Hip Priest" and "Winter" that would've been boring from anybody else are made invigorating with Smith's shouts and cryptic lyrics and the band's sudden explosions into noise rock. Of course I'm glad they continued, but this would've been a hell of a closer.
19: THE POGUES - IF I SHOULD FALL FROM GRACE WITH GOD
"The Turkish Song of the Damned" has the funniest story I've ever heard behind a song, so I'll let Shane tell you it: "'The Turkish Song of the Damned' was a Kraut trying to tell me something and I misheard him. He said 'Have you heard 'The Turkish Song' by The Damned'." Rum Sodomy and the Lash may be the more famous album, but this is the (slightly) better one, even if it took me some time to realize that. The hedonism and energy are greatly lowered, but MacGowan's lyrics are somehow even better here, dealing with more mature themes. It's also more eclectic. Ever wanted to hear a Celtic rock version of big band or Spanish music? You get that here. It certainly wears its heart on its sleeves, but that just makes for some of the best songs ever written. How can the title track or "Fairytale of New York" or "The Broad Majestic Shannon" not make you feel something?
18: XTC - ENGLISH SETTLEMENT
XTC makes their first dip into their arty future on English Settlement, a pleasant mix of new wave and art rock, with a few Afrobeat and juju experiments and many time signatures that aren't common in the world of pop music. It's both their longest and most consistent album, and it provides a plethora of catchy songs that dive into a politics deeper than XTC ever have. "Knuckle Down" may be the most delightfully silly anti-racism song ever made, and it's equally catchy.
17: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN - TUNNEL OF LOVE
While Nebraska has his best storytelling, Tunnel of Love has his best songwriting. Born in the U.S.A. often felt cheesy due to its overblown 80s production, and while that's still the case here, the synths are now more understated and better served by this album's softness and introspection. It may still be cheesy, but Bruce brings wonderful melodies and his best lyrics (mostly concerning his failing marriage). The A side is good, but this is likely the most back-loaded album of all time. The last six songs are the best, and they're all honest, resonant, and a bit depressing. The best song, "Brilliant Disguise" comes towards the end, beginning as an accusation towards his partner and - by only changing one word in the chorus - ending as a question of his own shortcomings.
16: THE DURUTTI COLUMN - VINI REILLY
Though undoubtedly influential on post-rock, the oft praised early work of the Durutti Column is a bit too passive for me. Though almost entirely instrumental, Vini Reilly still manages to evoke strong feelings of both melancholy and overwhelming joy. It's got everything from dream pop to new age to funk covered and it makes incredibly innovative use of sampling, obscuring the voices of soulful singers in a way that adds a deeper layer to the emotional atmosphere. The production is incredible; everything is aligned to perfectly bring out the most emotion. A one second sample can bring you to chills.
15: JOY DIVISION - SUBSTANCE
Substance is a compilation, but it's not a "best of" compilation. Joy Division were a band that didn't include their singles on their albums, and Substance compiles all of their singles along with a few B-sides and EP tracks to make for ten killer songs, ordered (mostly) chronologically that show how quickly this band evolved from 1978 to 1980, starting with punk rock and ending with synth-pop. As a depressed teenager, nothing got to me like this album. Curtis's vocals weren't perfect, but they oozed sincerity, and to me that made them imperfectly perfect. I think most everyone knows "Atmosphere" and "Love Will Tear Us Apart" but the other eight songs here are nearly as good.
14: PUBLIC IMAGE LTD. - THE FLOWERS OF ROMANCE
It's been called the most inaccessible album to ever be released on a major label, and that's hard to disagree with. After the departure of bassist Jah Wobble, whose reggae rhythms were essential to the band's sound; and without a steady drummer, John Lydon and Keith Levene took PiL into their own hands. Rather than replace their bassist, they just said "no bass" (there's only bass on a couple songs). Even the guitar is used much, much differently here, disregarding melody even more than on Metal Box and instead used for atmosphere. Most of the focus instead went into boomy, repetitive drumbeats that entirely constitute the melodies, Lydon's vocals that sound like a senile British grandma, and his experimentation with middle eastern instruments and musique concrète soundscapes using tapes. And while the drumming may not be all that complex, every single beat sticks in your head. There still isn't anything like this.
13: GANG OF FOUR - SOLID GOLD
The follow up to Entertainment! Solid Gold is the artier (and better) album. It's slower, much more menacing, a little angrier, and a bit funkier. This time around, Andy Gill's guitar work is less focused on melody and more off doing its own thing with an abrasive metallic sound. It's like a tighter, more structured, and dancier version of PiL's Metal Box. And there isn't even an ounce of filler, every song has me feeling energized. Their lyrics are also better here, exploring their Marxist themes in a more personal and effective fashion.
12: THE CLASH - COMBAT ROCK
Following the triple LP worldly excess of Sandinista! Mick Jones wanted to do it again. Joe Strummer panned his vision, half the songs were removed, and we wound up with Combat Rock. The decision lead to their breaking up, but as far as a last hurrahs go, Combat Rock succeeds, even if it's a little bittersweet and weaker than their previous work. It may be their most popular album, but it's also secretly their artiest. The album's A-side is filled with hits - I think everyone's heard "Rock the Casbah" and "Should I Stay or Should I Go," and you're sure to recognize "Straight to Hell" - but the B-side is where the best stuff is found, and is evidence of what Jones originally wanted to do; there's a few Exotica, funk, and hip hop experiments. Oddly calm for a Clash album but beautiful nevertheless.
11: TOM WAITS - SWORDFISHTROMBONES
Tom Waits' blues oriented music prior to Swordfishtrombones is... different to say the least. Apparently the story goes that once he met his wife, she introduced him to more avant-garde music such as Beefheart, and he loved it so much that he changed his sound overnight from conventional blues to whatever this is. Swordfishtrombones isn't his best album as that was still yet to come, but it his most important. Everything you could want is here, from hilarious dark jazz beat poetry like "Frank's Wild Years," to noir-ish experimental rockers with surreal storytelling like the title track, to sincere love songs like "Johnsburg, Illinois;" as well as many awesome jazz instrumentals.
10: THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS - LINCOLN
I'm not exaggerating when I say that no album has better writing than Lincoln. The melodies! How do they come up with so many of them?! The lyrics! There's so many that will make you laugh, and so many that'll rip your heart out (sometimes even in the same song). And there's all those experiments that manage to both seem unusual and fit in perfectly on a pop album. And those nasally vocals that perfectly convey everything they intend to? Lincoln is a goofy but earnest album, and there'll never be another like it, not even from the men who made it. But why should anyone expect there to be?
9: ANTENA - CAMINO DEL SOL
Joy Division / New Order and the Durutti Column may be the most well known bands from Factory Records, but the mostly female French band Antena was nearly as good. Their only album, Camino del sol, is an eighteen minute record that mixes lounge music and synth-pop with bossa nova to make for an entrancing dreamy atmosphere, and it's so irresistibly soft. Sometimes it blows my mind that this came out in 1982, it would fit in perfectly with modern indie pop. It simultaneously sounds like it's from the 60s, the 80s, 2013, and 2500. It sounds like the future, just not our future.
8: THE POLICE - GHOST IN THE MACHINE
The moment that cold, synth driven reggae beat comes in on the opener "Spirits in the Material World," it's clear that the Police have changed. The Police embracing 80s production could have ended poorly but they use it for a sleek, atmospheric sound that suits the album very well. Unlike the other Police albums, Ghost in the Machine is dark, cold, and far more political and affecting than the Police had ever been, even if it is more pop oriented than the band's first three albums. Stewart Copeland's drumming on this album is also some of the best I've ever heard, it isn't particularly flashy but he's always doing something interesting.
7: KING CRIMSON - DISCIPLINE
King Crimson were originally going to call it quits after Red. After all, it was their best album up to that point and would've made for the band's perfect ending (just listen to "Starless" and tell me those last thirty seconds aren't the perfect send-off). The only reason for them to come back would be if they could top Red - and that they did. Adrian Belew (Talking Heads) replaced John Wetton and became the group's frontman, singer, and main songwriter. On Discipline they adapted with the times, dropping the jazz and classical influences of their 70s work for new wave. Rather than being cold and distant like on their early work, they became warm and, at times, even inviting. Belew's lyrics are dorky but in a memorable and endearing - "Matte Kudasai" may be the prettiest song I've ever heard, and Belew's voice on it is incredible. The two closing instrumentals are also beautiful and quite groovy in spite of their insanely complicated time signatures (they would be a massive influence on all future math rock).
6: JOY DIVISION - CLOSER
It seems odd that Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook, and Stephen Morris didn't know this would be their last album as Joy Division when they chose the name "Closer" and put a grave on the cover. Just before its release, on the day before their first U.S. tour, Ian Curtis would hang himself while listening to Iggy Pop's The Idiot. And throughout Closer, it's clear how depressed Curtis was - never has there been more emotionally intense music. By comparison, Unknown Pleasures seems cheery. And it makes sense too, seeing as his life had gone through massive changes in just the past year: he had had an affair, his epilepsy had worsened, and he was about to go on a world tour when he was already uncomfortable performing as often as he did. At times, it feels like Curtis is writing his own epitaph, especially on "Twenty Four Hours": "Gotta find my destiny before it gets too late."
5: NEW ORDER - POWER, CORRUPTION AND LIES
Following the suicide of Ian Curtis, Joy Division still had a lot of phenomenal music left in them; they were just going to have to make it without him. And that they did. Rather than looking outside of the band for a new singer, guitarist Bernard Sumner apprehensively took over as the band's new singer and main songwriter. And he can't sing for shit, but his voice is quite nice and he's probably written half the great melodies in existence. After being Joy Division 2.0 on Movement (and doing a good job of it) New Order very quickly found their own identity on Power, Corruption and Lies, and you can tell the instant that the bass line on "Age of Consent" begins: it's almost happy. And is there anything as beautiful as that synth drenched bridge? Sumner's lyrics throughout are simple yet poetic and charming, the music is atmospheric and absurdly catchy, and it has several of the band's greatest songs. There's the joyous "The Village," the cold and mechanical "5-8-6," the epic "Your Silent Face," the melancholic closer "Leave Me Alone," and the top selling twelve inch single of all time, "Blue Monday" (which actually lost an insane amount of money due to its expensive packaging). Overall, this album is the band's peak and the one I enjoy revisiting the most.
4: TALK TALK - SPIRIT OF EDEN
It's pretty common for bands to become more popular and mainstream as they go on, but the other way around? Not as much. After three pop albums (one of which, The Colour of Spring, went 2x platinum) and a top 40 single, Talk Talk took a direction that was barely hinted at on The Colour of Spring. Completely convinced (for some strange reason) that his new idea would sell four million copies (spoiler alert: it sold an eighth of that), Mark Hollis and co. improvised for hours upon hours a day in a dark room for over a year, and when they were done they did some very extensive editing and chopped it all down to just forty minutes. This meditative piece of jazzy chamber music was not what the label had expected would come out of that studio. It was a totally unmarketable direction, and as a result Talk Talk was dropped from their label. It sounds as if mother nature thought decided to make an album. It's everything; peaceful, melancholic, uplifting, even a little angry. The best song here is "I Believe in You," a song about Mark Hollis's brother dying of a heroin overdose. Even if the same thing hadn't happened to my brother, this song's beauty would still give me chills every time I hear it. When that small choir comes in on the chorus, it moves me like nothing else.
3: TOM WAITS - RAIN DOGS
Swordfishtrombones was a good first step, but Rain Dogs is Tom Waits' masterpiece. Here he combines everything he'd done up to this point and adds more; here we have experimental rock, jazz, country, folk, and blues rock. It may not be as weird as Swordfishtrombones but it benefits from its more conventional songs. It seems that plenty of experimental music only aims stimulate you intellectually and totally forgets emotion, but Tom doesn't do that. "Hang Down Your Head," "Time," and "Downtown Train" are the three best and most emotional songs Tom ever made. It's an unusual world Tom's built with this album; involving lots of crime, carnivals, Cuban jails, gun street girls, and women with tattooed tears ("One for each year he's away"); but it's also a world that's full of hope and love.
2: THE POLICE - SYNCHRONICITY
At the time, they were the biggest band in the world. Some said Ghost in the Machine was a sellout album, and while Synchronicity is calmer and nearly as pop oriented, it'd be a mistake to think it's any worse than their early work - there is more substance here than on anything else they've done, with some of their densest, artiest music and Sting's most poetic and political lyrics. No matter how overplayed it is, "Every Breath You Take" will always be one of the all time great songs. The fact that so many people think it's a love song proves how well it achieves what it set out to, by being incredibly creepy while being barely creepy at all. The lyrics are so perfectly simple, the melody is one of the best ever, and it has a hairraising bridge and outro. "King of Pain" is another highlight, a brilliant passionate ballad with an ending that always moves me. And then there's the experimental rock track "Mother," one of the most hated songs ever, but that's likely only the case because of how strange it seemed to the humorless pop consumers. 'Tis is a jolly good tune.
1: THE CLASH - SANDINISTA!
I think we all have trouble putting the emotions our favorite pieces of art make us feel into words, so I'll try my best. Sandinista! is an album I never expected to love this much. First of all, it's a triple album - sold for the price of one, which required that CBS take a massive cut from the band, and the Clash gladly accepted - and it's two hours and 24 minutes long. If you're going to put 36 songs on an album, it's gonna need to be incredibly consistent if it wants to hold one's attention. Fortunately, Sandinista! has more perfect, hairraising songs than any other album ever. I think what puts the Clash ahead of almost all (or all) of the punk bands to emerge in the mid to late 70s is their ability to evolve. They never did the same thing twice; they'd immediately perfect something and then move on to something else. To me, Sandinista! is their album that exemplifies this ability the best. This album is two and a half hours of worldly weirdness with everything from post-punk to reggae to rockabilly to jazz to boogie woogie to calypso to rapping to disco to funk rock to folk to experimental rock to Celtic punk to children's choirs, and even some of their punk rock roots remain; and it covers everything from the draft to the Cuban Revolution to the Nicaraguan Sandinistas to simple breakups. It helps that everything here is done well (well, maybe the children's choirs didn't need to be there). It is the most passionate album you will ever hear, but in a surprisingly different way than London Calling. For one thing, Joe Strummer has vastly improved as a lyricist here. Compare "Death or Glory" to "Washington Bullets." The former is Joe's idealistic fantasies, the latter is an informative critique of the first world's interference in the goings of the developing world. Sandinista! is the culmination of months of recording in New York, in which every song they made turned out so damn good they had to release it all. Their approach to its making was quite loose; Joe Strummer had a bed in the back of the studio and he'd lay there reading while listening to music from all around the world, and whenever he felt an inspiration he'd simply get up and lay out his ideas. While many multiple LP albums try to be over the top epics, Sandinista! simply sets out to be a fun time with a purpose. Joe once said "After a while when journalists would ask us, 'Are you musicians or are you politicians?' I thought I'd watch us for 24 hours to get the answer. And I watched us and we only talked about music." And it makes sense. Just listen to "Corner Soul," one of the album's best songs; it's about many things, one of them being how music can be the most valuable thing there is, regardless of where you are. A bit cheesy, but it sums up Joe's messages quite well. If there were only one album I could listen to for the rest of my life, I'd pick this one in a heartbeat. Excess and consistency will never again go hand in hand the way they do on Sandinista! What're your favorite 80s albums?
submitted by MBTItypemeyo to u/MBTItypemeyo [link] [comments]


Iggy Pop spricht über seine wilde Zeit in Deutschland Iggy Pop - Passenger (Live at the Royal Albert Hall) - YouTube Iggy Pop's music a work of genius, says Iggy Pop (1977 ... Iggy and the Stooges  Live In Sydney  Full Concert - YouTube Iggy Pop + Josh Homme full Performance - [Live 2016] - YouTube BERLIN SURREAL - David Bowie und Iggy Pop in der ... Iggy Pop with David Bowie on The Dinah Shore Show (1977 ... Bowie: Me, Iggy, Drugs and Berlin - YouTube

Iggy Pop Preps 7-CD 'The Bowie Years' Box Set - Rolling Stone

  1. Iggy Pop spricht über seine wilde Zeit in Deutschland
  2. Iggy Pop - Passenger (Live at the Royal Albert Hall) - YouTube
  3. Iggy Pop's music a work of genius, says Iggy Pop (1977 ...
  4. Iggy and the Stooges Live In Sydney Full Concert - YouTube
  5. Iggy Pop + Josh Homme full Performance - [Live 2016] - YouTube
  6. BERLIN SURREAL - David Bowie und Iggy Pop in der ...
  7. Iggy Pop with David Bowie on The Dinah Shore Show (1977 ...
  8. Bowie: Me, Iggy, Drugs and Berlin - YouTube

SEGUINOS! INSTAGRAM: @gravitantesbanda Track List: 00:00 - BREAK INTO YOUR HEART 03:52 - GARDENIA 08:02 - AMERICAN VALHALLA 12:27 - SUNDAY 17:21 - GEMAN DAYS... Iggy Pop On The Berlin Period with David Bowie The Jonathan Ross Show - Duration: 4:32. The Jonathan Ross Show Recommended for you Iggy and the Stooges, live at The Hordern Pavilion in Sydney on April 2, 2013. It was an old-school punk party complete with stage invasions, crazy crowdsurf... Berlin in den 70er- und 80er-Jahren: Elias Matt und eine Filmcrew besuchen musikhistorische Stätten dieser Dekaden in der Mauerstadt voller Freaks und unwirk... Iggy's big comeback. I love Iggy (and Bowie), but lets face it, she HAD to have Bowie for sure. 2 for the price of 1! Iggy Pop - Post Pop Depression (Live At The Royal Albert Hall) DVD - http://smarturl.it/IGGYPOPPPDDVD Blu Ray - http://smarturl.it/IGGYPOPPPDBR DVD + CD - ht... Canadian journalist, Avi Lewis interview w/ David Bowie on Canada's Much Music TV show in 1997 Extract from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09f6PbnrlkQ Made... Watch Iggy Pop banter with CBC host Peter Gzowski in this 1977 archival clip. Subscribe to our channel! https://youtube.com/cbcmusic CBC Music is your hub fo...